Born In Bradford

Episodes

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Broadcast
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20090326
20100914

10,000 families have been recruited in one of the most ambitious studies of children's health ever undertaken in the world.

Bradford has twice the national rate of infant mortality and the highest rate of genetic illness in Britain.

Overall sixty per cent of births in the city are to families living amongst the poorest twenty per cent of those in the UK.

Bradford tops the national tables for heart disease, strokes and diabetes

Over half of the 6,000 babies born in the city every year are to Pakistani mothers and two thirds of these women are married to first or second cousins - which significantly increases the risk of autosomal recessive (i.e.

genetic) conditions.

Doctors have identified 147 of these different conditions in Bradford children, compared to between fifteen and twenty in other health districts.

Many lead to severe disabilities and reduced life expectancy.

According to the Head of the study, Professor John Wright, an epidemiologist based at Bradford Royal Infirmary, the aim is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness in newborns from all cultures and classes: "It's like a medical detective story really - trying to piece together the clues in people's lifestyles, their environments and their genetic make-up, as we try to determine whether someone falls sick or someone doesn't."

Safina Nagvi and her sister, Tahira, are keen to support the research.

Tahira has just given birth to her third child but has suffered various complications which she says might be linked to genetic problems: "we both married first cousins, and it is OK for us, it's not like we've been forced or we're unhappy - the way we've been brought up it is normal for us, we are happy with things that way.

"But we have had things in our family, though.

My son was born five weeks early.

He had a condition where the gut and the stomach were joined together.

I actually got a heart birth defect - they had to widen one of the arteries up.

I also had the same problem that my son had when I was born and we would like to know why".

According to Ann Barratt, the Family liaison officer for the project, one aspect of the study is people looking at why these things are happening: "we would like better understanding of some of these quite rare conditions you see in Bradford.

One of the main reasons for the study was because the still birth rate was almost double the UK average a few years ago and that's one of the things we're looking at, why is the mortality rate higher.".

Doctors are tracking thousands of Bradford babies from birth to better understand illness.

20100914

10,000 families have been recruited in one of the most ambitious studies of children's health ever undertaken in the world.

Bradford has twice the national rate of infant mortality and the highest rate of genetic illness in Britain.

Overall sixty per cent of births in the city are to families living amongst the poorest twenty per cent of those in the UK.

Bradford tops the national tables for heart disease, strokes and diabetes

Over half of the 6,000 babies born in the city every year are to Pakistani mothers and two thirds of these women are married to first or second cousins - which significantly increases the risk of autosomal recessive (i.e.

genetic) conditions.

Doctors have identified 147 of these different conditions in Bradford children, compared to between fifteen and twenty in other health districts.

Many lead to severe disabilities and reduced life expectancy.

According to the Head of the study, Professor John Wright, an epidemiologist based at Bradford Royal Infirmary, the aim is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness in newborns from all cultures and classes: "It's like a medical detective story really - trying to piece together the clues in people's lifestyles, their environments and their genetic make-up, as we try to determine whether someone falls sick or someone doesn't."

Safina Nagvi and her sister, Tahira, are keen to support the research.

Tahira has just given birth to her third child but has suffered various complications which she says might be linked to genetic problems: "we both married first cousins, and it is OK for us, it's not like we've been forced or we're unhappy - the way we've been brought up it is normal for us, we are happy with things that way.

"But we have had things in our family, though.

My son was born five weeks early.

He had a condition where the gut and the stomach were joined together.

I actually got a heart birth defect - they had to widen one of the arteries up.

I also had the same problem that my son had when I was born and we would like to know why".

According to Ann Barratt, the Family liaison officer for the project, one aspect of the study is people looking at why these things are happening: "we would like better understanding of some of these quite rare conditions you see in Bradford.

One of the main reasons for the study was because the still birth rate was almost double the UK average a few years ago and that's one of the things we're looking at, why is the mortality rate higher.".

Doctors are tracking thousands of Bradford babies from birth to better understand illness.

10,000 families have been recruited in one of the most ambitious studies of children's health ever undertaken in the world. Bradford has twice the national rate of infant mortality and the highest rate of genetic illness in Britain. Overall sixty per cent of births in the city are to families living amongst the poorest twenty per cent of those in the UK. Bradford tops the national tables for heart disease, strokes and diabetes

Over half of the 6,000 babies born in the city every year are to Pakistani mothers and two thirds of these women are married to first or second cousins - which significantly increases the risk of autosomal recessive (i.e. genetic) conditions. Doctors have identified 147 of these different conditions in Bradford children, compared to between fifteen and twenty in other health districts. Many lead to severe disabilities and reduced life expectancy.

Safina Nagvi and her sister, Tahira, are keen to support the research. Tahira has just given birth to her third child but has suffered various complications which she says might be linked to genetic problems: "we both married first cousins, and it is OK for us, it's not like we've been forced or we're unhappy - the way we've been brought up it is normal for us, we are happy with things that way.

"But we have had things in our family, though. My son was born five weeks early. He had a condition where the gut and the stomach were joined together. I actually got a heart birth defect - they had to widen one of the arteries up. I also had the same problem that my son had when I was born and we would like to know why".

According to Ann Barratt, the Family liaison officer for the project, one aspect of the study is people looking at why these things are happening: "we would like better understanding of some of these quite rare conditions you see in Bradford. One of the main reasons for the study was because the still birth rate was almost double the UK average a few years ago and that's one of the things we're looking at, why is the mortality rate higher.".

20081112

Winifred Robinson follows the fortunes of some of the thousands of babies being tracked by the Bradford Institute for Health Research in an effort to find out why genetic disorders and cases of infant and child mortality are so high in the city of Bradford.

Eventually, 10,000 families will be recruited in what will be the most ambitious study of children's health ever undertaken in the world.

This is the first of three programmes to be broadcast over the next 18 months that will follow the progress of the study.

20100719

Thousands of Bradford babies are being followed in the biggest health survey of its kind.

This is now reaching a crucial milestone for providing key insights into diabetes, obesity and certain genetic conditions.

Winifred Robinson reports.

10,000 families have been recruited in one of the most ambitious studies of children's health ever undertaken in the world.

Bradford has twice the national rate of infant mortality and the highest rate of genetic illness in Britain.

Overall sixty per cent of births in the city are to families living amongst the poorest twenty per cent of those in the UK.

Bradford tops the national tables for heart disease, strokes and diabetes.

Over half of the 6,000 babies born in the city every year have Pakistani mothers and two thirds of these women are married to first or second cousins - which significantly increases the risk of autosomal recessive (i.e.

genetic) conditions.

Doctors have identified 147 of these different conditions in Bradford children, compared to between fifteen and twenty in other health districts.

Many lead to severe disabilities and reduced life expectancy.

According to the head of the study, Professor John Wright, an epidemiologist based at Bradford Royal Infirmary, the aim is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness in newborns from all cultures and classes: "It's like a medical detective story really - trying to piece together the clues in people's lifestyles, their environments and their genetic make-up, as we try to determine whether someone falls sick or someone doesn't."

Safina and her sister, Tahira, are keen to support the research.

Tahira has just given birth to her third child but has suffered various complications which she says might be linked to genetic problems: "we both married first cousins, and it is OK for us, it's not like we've been forced or we're unhappy - the way we've been brought up it is normal for us, we are happy with things that way.

"But we have had things in our family, though.

My son was born five weeks early.

He had a condition where the gut and the stomach were joined together.

I actually got a heart birth defect - they had to widen one of the arteries up.

I also had the same problem that my son had when I was born: I had the same surgery he had at four days old in the same hospital 29 years ago.

"They think because my son got the same condition that it might be genetic and might be linked to cousin marriage.

I also had a still birth at 22 weeks in my pregnancy, it was devastating, horrible.

One of our relatives, our first cousin, she had two still births within a year."

According to Ann Barratt, the Family Liaison Officer for the project, one aspect of the study is people looking at why these things are happening: "These quite rare conditions you see in Bradford.

One of the main reasons for the study was because the still birth rate was almost double the UK average a few years ago - that's one of the things we're looking at, why is the mortality rate higher."

Tahira is also supportive of the research findings on gestational diabetes, which was something she suffered from in her latest pregnancy: "It's good that Bradford is testing for all of these things and monitoring mothers so closely - that can only help families like ours and I'm happy to be part of the study"

Raj Bhopal, Professor of Public Health at Edinburgh University, said the research would be crucial in developing a better understanding of diabetes, which poses a significant problem for the health service: "We're in the grip of a diabetes epidemic.

There are 200 million people in the world with the condition and in the UK alone the cost to the NHS is about GBP10 billion - roughly ten percent of the NHS budget

"Born in Bradford will be crucial in developing a better understanding of what's happening.

Why are so many people developing the condition: in the UK cases have doubled and the figures amongst the South Asian population here are very high, at around sixteen per cent, compared to four per cent in the population as a whole depending on how you measure it.

"We know that if you're born small and put on weight then your risk of diabetes explodes.

In India, in traditional lives, they would of stayed small and slim.

What we want to learn is how the babies are going to grow, when the fat will be laid down and the exact relationship between the fat being laid down and the onset of diabetes.

We're beginning to get some sort of handle on the mystery and born in Bradford will be a way of understanding this better.".

Winifred Robinson on how doctors are tracking Bradford babies to help understand illness.

20100719

Thousands of Bradford babies are being followed in the biggest health survey of its kind.

This is now reaching a crucial milestone for providing key insights into diabetes, obesity and certain genetic conditions.

Winifred Robinson reports.

10,000 families have been recruited in one of the most ambitious studies of children's health ever undertaken in the world.

Bradford has twice the national rate of infant mortality and the highest rate of genetic illness in Britain.

Overall sixty per cent of births in the city are to families living amongst the poorest twenty per cent of those in the UK.

Bradford tops the national tables for heart disease, strokes and diabetes.

Over half of the 6,000 babies born in the city every year have Pakistani mothers and two thirds of these women are married to first or second cousins - which significantly increases the risk of autosomal recessive (i.e.

genetic) conditions.

Doctors have identified 147 of these different conditions in Bradford children, compared to between fifteen and twenty in other health districts.

Many lead to severe disabilities and reduced life expectancy.

According to the head of the study, Professor John Wright, an epidemiologist based at Bradford Royal Infirmary, the aim is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness in newborns from all cultures and classes: "It's like a medical detective story really - trying to piece together the clues in people's lifestyles, their environments and their genetic make-up, as we try to determine whether someone falls sick or someone doesn't."

Safina and her sister, Tahira, are keen to support the research.

Tahira has just given birth to her third child but has suffered various complications which she says might be linked to genetic problems: "we both married first cousins, and it is OK for us, it's not like we've been forced or we're unhappy - the way we've been brought up it is normal for us, we are happy with things that way.

"But we have had things in our family, though.

My son was born five weeks early.

He had a condition where the gut and the stomach were joined together.

I actually got a heart birth defect - they had to widen one of the arteries up.

I also had the same problem that my son had when I was born: I had the same surgery he had at four days old in the same hospital 29 years ago.

"They think because my son got the same condition that it might be genetic and might be linked to cousin marriage.

I also had a still birth at 22 weeks in my pregnancy, it was devastating, horrible.

One of our relatives, our first cousin, she had two still births within a year."

According to Ann Barratt, the Family Liaison Officer for the project, one aspect of the study is people looking at why these things are happening: "These quite rare conditions you see in Bradford.

One of the main reasons for the study was because the still birth rate was almost double the UK average a few years ago - that's one of the things we're looking at, why is the mortality rate higher."

Tahira is also supportive of the research findings on gestational diabetes, which was something she suffered from in her latest pregnancy: "It's good that Bradford is testing for all of these things and monitoring mothers so closely - that can only help families like ours and I'm happy to be part of the study"

Raj Bhopal, Professor of Public Health at Edinburgh University, said the research would be crucial in developing a better understanding of diabetes, which poses a significant problem for the health service: "We're in the grip of a diabetes epidemic.

There are 200 million people in the world with the condition and in the UK alone the cost to the NHS is about GBP10 billion - roughly ten percent of the NHS budget

"Born in Bradford will be crucial in developing a better understanding of what's happening.

Why are so many people developing the condition: in the UK cases have doubled and the figures amongst the South Asian population here are very high, at around sixteen per cent, compared to four per cent in the population as a whole depending on how you measure it.

"We know that if you're born small and put on weight then your risk of diabetes explodes.

In India, in traditional lives, they would of stayed small and slim.

What we want to learn is how the babies are going to grow, when the fat will be laid down and the exact relationship between the fat being laid down and the onset of diabetes.

We're beginning to get some sort of handle on the mystery and born in Bradford will be a way of understanding this better.".

Winifred Robinson on how doctors are tracking Bradford babies to help understand illness.

20120418

Families have given blood samples, medical histories, details of their educational attainment, eating and parenting habits, family structures and incomes. As the first children to join the study start school, Winifred finds out how they have fared.

The research team is based at the Bradford Royal Infirmary and its work will provide solid evidence to help answer some of the great medical puzzles of our time: everything from why some people have heart disease and depression to what is driving the rises in incidence of diabetes, asthma and obesity. The findings on cot death are just about to be released, with results that will significantly modify the guidance to parents. Other studies soon to be released with assess how far a pregnant mother's diet affects her baby's health.

The city is ethnically diverse - more than half of the 6,000 babies born each year have a mother of Pakistani origin. Bradford also has the highest rate of genetic illness in Britain and this is due to genetic disorders passed on in cousin marriages. The research has demonstrated that two thirds of mothers of Pakistani origin in Bradford have husbands who are their first or second cousins - which significantly increases the risk of autosomal recessive conditions.

This is the third programme in a continuing series and a chance to see how life is unfolding for young optimistic mothers in sometimes troubled relationships and difficult circumstances. Winifred spoke to them four years ago and catches up with their stories again.

According to the Head of the study, Professor John Wright - an epidemiologist based at Bradford Royal Infirmary - the aim is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness in children from all cultures and classes as their lives unfold: "It's like a medical detective story really - trying to piece together the clues in people's lifestyles, their environments and their genetic make-up, as we try to determine whether someone falls sick or someone doesn't.".

Winifred Robinson tracks researchers on one of the world's largest child health studies.

20120418

Families have given blood samples, medical histories, details of their educational attainment, eating and parenting habits, family structures and incomes. As the first children to join the study start school, Winifred finds out how they have fared.

The research team is based at the Bradford Royal Infirmary and its work will provide solid evidence to help answer some of the great medical puzzles of our time: everything from why some people have heart disease and depression to what is driving the rises in incidence of diabetes, asthma and obesity. The findings on cot death are just about to be released, with results that will significantly modify the guidance to parents. Other studies soon to be released with assess how far a pregnant mother's diet affects her baby's health.

The city is ethnically diverse - more than half of the 6,000 babies born each year have a mother of Pakistani origin. Bradford also has the highest rate of genetic illness in Britain and this is due to genetic disorders passed on in cousin marriages. The research has demonstrated that two thirds of mothers of Pakistani origin in Bradford have husbands who are their first or second cousins - which significantly increases the risk of autosomal recessive conditions.

This is the third programme in a continuing series and a chance to see how life is unfolding for young optimistic mothers in sometimes troubled relationships and difficult circumstances. Winifred spoke to them four years ago and catches up with their stories again.

According to the Head of the study, Professor John Wright - an epidemiologist based at Bradford Royal Infirmary - the aim is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness in children from all cultures and classes as their lives unfold: "It's like a medical detective story really - trying to piece together the clues in people's lifestyles, their environments and their genetic make-up, as we try to determine whether someone falls sick or someone doesn't.".

Winifred Robinson tracks researchers on one of the world's largest child health studies.

20130614

Born in Bradford is one of the biggest medical research studies undertaken in the UK: its aim is to find out more about the causes of illness by studying children as their lives unfold. Winifred Robinson has been alongside researchers from the start, in 2007, and has followed the recruitment of 14,000 babies and their families. They are now been tracked and Information gathered has already led to changes in how pregnant women in the city are monitored and their babies cared for.In this programme Winifred looks at research into the effect of the potentially toxic chemical, acrylamide - present in a range of foods, including crisps, coffee and chips. The diet of mothers to be in Bradford contributed to an international study of 1,100 pregnant women and newborns, led by the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology in Spain. The babies in Bradford were found to have the highest levels of acrylamide, which can cause lower birth rates and smaller heads. These birth outcomes are linked to health problems in later life, including poor child health, delayed brain development, and diabetes and heart disease in adulthood.According to Professor John Wright, a clinical epidemiologist at the Bradford Institute for Health Research, the findings show how important it is to start educating pregnant women about the risks: "our study provides the most definitive scientific evidence yet that eating foods high in acrylamide during the critical pregnancy period can affect foetal health. The level found in the Bradford babies was twice the level of the Danish babies, for instance. Pregnant women need to be given more information about the risk from acrylamide and the food industry must also explore effective ways of reducing acrylamide levels in its products."The impetus for the Born in Bradford study came from the high infant mortality rate in the City - the second highest in the country at the launch of the study, according to the Bradford Infant Mortality Commission. In addition Bradford has a range of autosomal recessive conditions which aren't seen elsewhere - with more than 150 of them identified by paediatricians and community teams. In an effort to understand some of these extremely rare conditions researchers have been tracing the genetic history of new parents and looking at the part played by cousin marriages, which account for three quarters of marriages amongst Pakistanis in the city. The Born in Bradford team is now on the brink of providing the most detailed calculation of the actual risks involved in cousin marriage. One of the advantages of this work is that those in the position of having children with recessive conditions can be offered alternatives when they next consider getting pregnant. Ruba is 24 and has two children with I Cell disease, a rare and incurable metabolic disorder which has already claimed the life of her five year old son, Hassan and which will inevitably kill his younger sister, Alishba. Ruba is married to her cousin and has a one in four chance of any subsequent pregnancies resulting in children born with the same condition. Winifred follows Ruba as she considers her options and listens to the advice and guidance offered.

20130614

Born in Bradford is one of the biggest medical research studies undertaken in the UK: its aim is to find out more about the causes of illness by studying children as their lives unfold. Winifred Robinson has been alongside researchers from the start, in 2007, and has followed the recruitment of 14,000 babies and their families. They are now been tracked and Information gathered has already led to changes in how pregnant women in the city are monitored and their babies cared for.In this programme Winifred looks at research into the effect of the potentially toxic chemical, acrylamide - present in a range of foods, including crisps, coffee and chips. The diet of mothers to be in Bradford contributed to an international study of 1,100 pregnant women and newborns, led by the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology in Spain. The babies in Bradford were found to have the highest levels of acrylamide, which can cause lower birth rates and smaller heads. These birth outcomes are linked to health problems in later life, including poor child health, delayed brain development, and diabetes and heart disease in adulthood.According to Professor John Wright, a clinical epidemiologist at the Bradford Institute for Health Research, the findings show how important it is to start educating pregnant women about the risks: "our study provides the most definitive scientific evidence yet that eating foods high in acrylamide during the critical pregnancy period can affect foetal health. The level found in the Bradford babies was twice the level of the Danish babies, for instance. Pregnant women need to be given more information about the risk from acrylamide and the food industry must also explore effective ways of reducing acrylamide levels in its products."The impetus for the Born in Bradford study came from the high infant mortality rate in the City - the second highest in the country at the launch of the study, according to the Bradford Infant Mortality Commission. In addition Bradford has a range of autosomal recessive conditions which aren't seen elsewhere - with more than 150 of them identified by paediatricians and community teams. In an effort to understand some of these extremely rare conditions researchers have been tracing the genetic history of new parents and looking at the part played by cousin marriages, which account for three quarters of marriages amongst Pakistanis in the city. The Born in Bradford team is now on the brink of providing the most detailed calculation of the actual risks involved in cousin marriage. One of the advantages of this work is that those in the position of having children with recessive conditions can be offered alternatives when they next consider getting pregnant. Ruba is 24 and has two children with I Cell disease, a rare and incurable metabolic disorder which has already claimed the life of her five year old son, Hassan and which will inevitably kill his younger sister, Alishba. Ruba is married to her cousin and has a one in four chance of any subsequent pregnancies resulting in children born with the same condition. Winifred follows Ruba as she considers her options and listens to the advice and guidance offered.

20140516

The Born in Bradford researchers are determined that theirs should be an applied health research study with results leading to better services. "Everything we do gets translated into practice so that our work on congenital anomalies has led to a city register for these children and also a Yorkshire register," says Professor John Wright, the Director of the Bradford Institute for Health Research.

The tradition of marrying a cousin is becoming more entrenched among British-born Pakistanis living in Bradford than it was a generation ago. Cousin marriage has important implications for health because marrying a cousin increases the risks of passing on genetic disorders. Ruba, who married her second cousin, had two children with I-cell disease. Tragically both Hassam and Alishbah died and professionals working with couples like Ruba and her husband hope that in the future they will be able to provide better genetic screening and advice.

"It was a real shock to me when he was diagnosed," she says, "I didn't even know what it was, we've nearly all been married to cousins in our family and we didn't know this condition existed."

Born in Bradford was launched in 2007 - one of the world's largest longitudinal studies with 13,500 babies and their mothers agreeing to be followed. The impetus for research came from high infant mortality rates - double the national average - and so far the data has resulted in changes including universal testing for gestational diabetes and greater counselling about conditions associated with cousin marriages. About 39 per cent of mothers in the study are of white British origin, and 46 per cent are from Pakistan, providing a fascinating insight into a new multi-ethnic generation

With those babies having reached school age there's greater attention on research projects examining how they fare. In 2012 researchers began testing hand and eye co-ordination, vocabulary and letter recognition with all the children in the reception classes of 88 primary schools. They also worked with school nurses to measure cardiovascular health and in this programme they examine other factors influencing health, including air pollution, exercise levels and diet.

Winifred follows some of the Bradford youngsters given air pollution monitoring back packs as they go about their daily lives. These are equipped with ultra violet analysis and I-phones that track their route to and from school and link exposure levels through local pollution monitoring units. The backpacks sit next to the youngsters during class and even give an indication of exposure during play times, for example. Those taking part give samples which are being monitored and assessed when variables, like the school route, are changed.

There are also the new stand sit desks - something all of us might be hearing more about given concerns about our more sedentary lifestyles. At one Bradford school pupils are trialling desks which can be raised and lowered, giving youngsters some movement during lessons. Wearing activity monitors the benefits can be judged in terms of increased metabolic rates as well whether they improve concentration levels. Medical research suggests constant sitting is harming health - stand sit desks might provide a solution that extends beyond.

20140516

The Born in Bradford researchers are determined that theirs should be an applied health research study with results leading to better services. "Everything we do gets translated into practice so that our work on congenital anomalies has led to a city register for these children and also a Yorkshire register," says Professor John Wright, the Director of the Bradford Institute for Health Research.

The tradition of marrying a cousin is becoming more entrenched among British-born Pakistanis living in Bradford than it was a generation ago. Cousin marriage has important implications for health because marrying a cousin increases the risks of passing on genetic disorders. Ruba, who married her second cousin, had two children with I-cell disease. Tragically both Hassam and Alishbah died and professionals working with couples like Ruba and her husband hope that in the future they will be able to provide better genetic screening and advice.

"It was a real shock to me when he was diagnosed," she says, "I didn't even know what it was, we've nearly all been married to cousins in our family and we didn't know this condition existed."

Born in Bradford was launched in 2007 - one of the world's largest longitudinal studies with 13,500 babies and their mothers agreeing to be followed. The impetus for research came from high infant mortality rates - double the national average - and so far the data has resulted in changes including universal testing for gestational diabetes and greater counselling about conditions associated with cousin marriages. About 39 per cent of mothers in the study are of white British origin, and 46 per cent are from Pakistan, providing a fascinating insight into a new multi-ethnic generation

With those babies having reached school age there's greater attention on research projects examining how they fare. In 2012 researchers began testing hand and eye co-ordination, vocabulary and letter recognition with all the children in the reception classes of 88 primary schools. They also worked with school nurses to measure cardiovascular health and in this programme they examine other factors influencing health, including air pollution, exercise levels and diet.

Winifred follows some of the Bradford youngsters given air pollution monitoring back packs as they go about their daily lives. These are equipped with ultra violet analysis and I-phones that track their route to and from school and link exposure levels through local pollution monitoring units. The backpacks sit next to the youngsters during class and even give an indication of exposure during play times, for example. Those taking part give samples which are being monitored and assessed when variables, like the school route, are changed.

There are also the new stand sit desks - something all of us might be hearing more about given concerns about our more sedentary lifestyles. At one Bradford school pupils are trialling desks which can be raised and lowered, giving youngsters some movement during lessons. Wearing activity monitors the benefits can be judged in terms of increased metabolic rates as well whether they improve concentration levels. Medical research suggests constant sitting is harming health - stand sit desks might provide a solution that extends beyond.

20160523

20160523

Winifred Robinson has returned to Bradford every year to report on mothers like Ruba, who is now 27. When they first met Ruba had a son, Hassam, and had just given birth to a little girl, Alishbah. Tragically both children were diagnosed with a rare condition, I-cell disease and have since died. Ruba is pregnant again and Winifred talks to her about genetic screening and the difficult choices she must make. She is married to her cousin and there is a one in four chance of her next baby being born with this fatal condition.

Researchers in Bradford have documented the incidence of genetic abnormalities linked to cousin marriage, which doubles the risk of passing on the recessive genes that lead to abnormalities. Cystic fibrosis is the one we all know about, where two healthy parents carry a recessive gene: in Bradford doctors have identified more than 200 rare conditions. Data collected by the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit has shown since 1997 there have been 902 British children born with neurodegenerative conditions, with 8% of these in Bradford, which only has 1% of the population.

"Everything we do gets translated into practice so that our work on congenital anomalies has led to a city register for these children and also a Yorkshire register" explains Professor Wright, the Director of the Bradford Institute for Health Research. On the face of it the risk is not great - a 4% risk of having a child with an abnormality if you marry a cousin, compared with 2% among the general population. But with repeated cousin marriage, the risks stack up in families with sometimes devastating results.

The Born in Bradford researchers are determined that theirs should be an applied health research study with results leading to better services. They have just secured £49 million of lottery funding to intervene in the lives of a new cohort of mothers as part of the Better Start initiative: "We want everything we find out in the research studies to be translated into practices that improve the health and well-being of people in Bradford and further afield" says Professor Wright.

The study was launched in 2007 and provides great insight health and lifestyle in the city. About 46 per cent of mothers in the study are from Pakistan, providing a fascinating insight into a new multi-ethnic generation. The impetus for research came from high infant mortality rates - double the national average - and so far the data has resulted in changes in national policy. Bradford now screens all pregnant women for gestational diabetes and Winifred meets those being encouraged to change their diet and habits to give their babies the best start in life.

Produced by Sue Mitchell.

2016052320160525 (R4)

Winifred Robinson reports on the lives of thousands of families being tracked in Bradford.

Winifred Robinson has returned to Bradford every year to report on mothers like Ruba, who is now 27. When they first met Ruba had a son, Hassam, and had just given birth to a little girl, Alishbah. Tragically both children were diagnosed with a rare condition, I-cell disease and have since died. Ruba is pregnant again and Winifred talks to her about genetic screening and the difficult choices she must make. She is married to her cousin and there is a one in four chance of her next baby being born with this fatal condition.

Researchers in Bradford have documented the incidence of genetic abnormalities linked to cousin marriage, which doubles the risk of passing on the recessive genes that lead to abnormalities. Cystic fibrosis is the one we all know about, where two healthy parents carry a recessive gene: in Bradford doctors have identified more than 200 rare conditions. Data collected by the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit has shown since 1997 there have been 902 British children born with neurodegenerative conditions, with 8% of these in Bradford, which only has 1% of the population.

"Everything we do gets translated into practice so that our work on congenital anomalies has led to a city register for these children and also a Yorkshire register" explains Professor Wright, the Director of the Bradford Institute for Health Research. On the face of it the risk is not great - a 4% risk of having a child with an abnormality if you marry a cousin, compared with 2% among the general population. But with repeated cousin marriage, the risks stack up in families with sometimes devastating results.

The Born in Bradford researchers are determined that theirs should be an applied health research study with results leading to better services. They have just secured £49 million of lottery funding to intervene in the lives of a new cohort of mothers as part of the Better Start initiative: "We want everything we find out in the research studies to be translated into practices that improve the health and well-being of people in Bradford and further afield" says Professor Wright.

The study was launched in 2007 and provides great insight health and lifestyle in the city. About 46 per cent of mothers in the study are from Pakistan, providing a fascinating insight into a new multi-ethnic generation. The impetus for research came from high infant mortality rates - double the national average - and so far the data has resulted in changes in national policy. Bradford now screens all pregnant women for gestational diabetes and Winifred meets those being encouraged to change their diet and habits to give their babies the best start in life.

Produced by Sue Mitchell.

2016052320160525 (R4)

Winifred Robinson reports on the lives of thousands of families being tracked in Bradford.

20170630

Winifred Robinson reports on the Born in Bradford research involving thousands of babies.

Winifred Robinson has been alongside the Born in Bradford researchers since the study was launched in 2007. The findings covered in this broadcast range from data on sleep patterns, through to studies on how children learn and the development of solutions to poor hand control which holds back writing and delayed motor skills. The youngsters are also being tracked to see who needs glasses and why so many of them fail to wear the very lenses which could effectively 'cure' eye problems and every family is being seen, scanned, weighed and measured in an effort to collect new markers on their health at this key point

Bradford has one of the highest birth rates in Britain but of the 6,000 babies born every year at least half are of South East Asian origin and face rates of diabetes and heart disease of four times the national average. Ten years on from the launch of Born in Bradford the researchers have been able to combine health research with a new generation growing up, to help improve the health of the next generation. Of the 14,000 babies recruited into the study, the parents were found to come from 46 different countries and to speak 52 different languages.

The children and their families were recruited between 2007 and 2009, and are now between eight and ten years old. They are being asked for information on many aspects of their life, starting with their bed time routines. There are different factors at work in the white and Asian communities and many of the children are going to sleep with computer screens, televisions and mobiles in their rooms. Researchers are keen to see what impact their bed times and preparations for bed have on their health, school attainment and wellbeing.

Other areas of study include the push to improve fitness levels throughout the city, in part by focusing on the Mosques and ways of getting lifestyle messages across in a community with high rates of diabetes, in particular. There are women only gyms springing up and Winifred meets some of the Asian mothers hoping to improve their lifestyles. She also tracks the research underway in 89 local schools as children are asked about how much sport and exercise they do. These children are being tested for hand eye coordination and other patterns which could affect their educational attainment. At Leeds University robotic arms are being produced to provide inexpensive solutions to Bradford teachers once problems with pen control, for instance, have been identified.

Dr John Wright, who leads the study, believes that it is changing lives and he is keen for Bradford to be viewed as the City of Research. In part the change comes from new findings and adapting approaches, but there is also a protective element from having such a close role in the lives of so many: "These youngsters are growing up with health researchers alongside them and we see this as a collaborative approach which helps our teams and the families of this city.".

20170630

Winifred Robinson reports on the Born in Bradford research involving thousands of babies.

Winifred Robinson has been alongside the Born in Bradford researchers since the study was launched in 2007. The findings covered in this broadcast range from data on sleep patterns, through to studies on how children learn and the development of solutions to poor hand control which holds back writing and delayed motor skills. The youngsters are also being tracked to see who needs glasses and why so many of them fail to wear the very lenses which could effectively 'cure' eye problems and every family is being seen, scanned, weighed and measured in an effort to collect new markers on their health at this key point

Bradford has one of the highest birth rates in Britain but of the 6,000 babies born every year at least half are of South East Asian origin and face rates of diabetes and heart disease of four times the national average. Ten years on from the launch of Born in Bradford the researchers have been able to combine health research with a new generation growing up, to help improve the health of the next generation. Of the 14,000 babies recruited into the study, the parents were found to come from 46 different countries and to speak 52 different languages.

The children and their families were recruited between 2007 and 2009, and are now between eight and ten years old. They are being asked for information on many aspects of their life, starting with their bed time routines. There are different factors at work in the white and Asian communities and many of the children are going to sleep with computer screens, televisions and mobiles in their rooms. Researchers are keen to see what impact their bed times and preparations for bed have on their health, school attainment and wellbeing.

Other areas of study include the push to improve fitness levels throughout the city, in part by focusing on the Mosques and ways of getting lifestyle messages across in a community with high rates of diabetes, in particular. There are women only gyms springing up and Winifred meets some of the Asian mothers hoping to improve their lifestyles. She also tracks the research underway in 89 local schools as children are asked about how much sport and exercise they do. These children are being tested for hand eye coordination and other patterns which could affect their educational attainment. At Leeds University robotic arms are being produced to provide inexpensive solutions to Bradford teachers once problems with pen control, for instance, have been identified.

Dr John Wright, who leads the study, believes that it is changing lives and he is keen for Bradford to be viewed as the City of Research. In part the change comes from new findings and adapting approaches, but there is also a protective element from having such a close role in the lives of so many: "These youngsters are growing up with health researchers alongside them and we see this as a collaborative approach which helps our teams and the families of this city.".

0120090326

Winifred Robinson follows the fortunes of some of the thousands of babies being tracked by the Bradford Institute for Health Research in an effort to find out why genetic disorders and cases of infant and child mortality are so high in the city of Bradford.

Eventually, 10,000 families will be recruited in what will be the most ambitious study of children's health ever undertaken in the world.

This is the first of three programmes to be broadcast over 18 months that will follow the progress of the study.

Why are genetic disorders and cases of infant mortality are so high in Bradford?

0120090326

Winifred Robinson follows the fortunes of some of the thousands of babies being tracked by the Bradford Institute for Health Research in an effort to find out why genetic disorders and cases of infant and child mortality are so high in the city of Bradford.

Eventually, 10,000 families will be recruited in what will be the most ambitious study of children's health ever undertaken in the world.

This is the first of three programmes to be broadcast over 18 months that will follow the progress of the study.

Why are genetic disorders and cases of infant mortality are so high in Bradford?

0120081112

Winifred Robinson follows the fortunes of some of the thousands of babies being tracked by the Bradford Institute for Health Research in an effort to find out why genetic disorders and cases of infant and child mortality are so high in the city of Bradford.

Eventually, 10,000 families will be recruited in what will be the most ambitious study of children's health ever undertaken in the world.

This is the first of three programmes to be broadcast over the next 18 months that will follow the progress of the study.

0120081112

Winifred Robinson follows the fortunes of some of the thousands of babies being tracked by the Bradford Institute for Health Research in an effort to find out why genetic disorders and cases of infant and child mortality are so high in the city of Bradford.

Eventually, 10,000 families will be recruited in what will be the most ambitious study of children's health ever undertaken in the world.

This is the first of three programmes to be broadcast over the next 18 months that will follow the progress of the study.

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0302The Threshold Of The Modern World (1375-1550 Ad), Ming Banknote
32The Threshold of the Modern World (1375-1550 AD), Ming Banknote