Bob Dylan - Changing Times

Episodes

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6M011969, Nashville Skyline2010071020110524

Another chance to hear a series assessing Bob Dylan's career at the end of three decades - 1969, 1979 and 1989 - and, with the help of those who have worked with and written about the enigmatic star, exploring the ways in which he re-invented himself at those times.

Part 1: 1969 - Nashville Skyline.

Having been out of the public eye for quite some time, Dylan returned with a new album, a new sound and new look in 1969.

The album Nashville Skyline surprised many with its simple country-tinged songs.

He appeared on Johnny Cash's TV show and chose to return to the concert stage not at Woodstock, but at the Isle of Wight Festival.

In this programme we hear from Judy Gascoyne, who was housekeeper for Bob and Sara Dylan while they stayed at a farm on the island to rehearse with The Band in a barn.

Bob entertained his friends The Beatles at the farm and played tennis with them.

We also hear from Dylan biographer Howard Sounes and musician and Dylan chronicler Sid Griffin as well as former England cricket captain Bob Willis, who added the name Dylan to his forenames and has seen Dylan live around fifty times.

In 1969, Dylan returned with a new album, a new sound and new look.

Bob Dylan -Changing Times:1969:Nashville Skyline.

Having been out of the public eye for quite some time, Bob Dylan returned in 1969 with a new album, a new sound and new look.

6M011969, Nashville Skyline2010071020110524

Another chance to hear a series assessing Bob Dylan's career at the end of three decades - 1969, 1979 and 1989 - and, with the help of those who have worked with and written about the enigmatic star, exploring the ways in which he re-invented himself at those times.

Part 1: 1969 - Nashville Skyline.

Having been out of the public eye for quite some time, Dylan returned with a new album, a new sound and new look in 1969.

The album Nashville Skyline surprised many with its simple country-tinged songs.

He appeared on Johnny Cash's TV show and chose to return to the concert stage not at Woodstock, but at the Isle of Wight Festival.

In this programme we hear from Judy Gascoyne, who was housekeeper for Bob and Sara Dylan while they stayed at a farm on the island to rehearse with The Band in a barn.

Bob entertained his friends The Beatles at the farm and played tennis with them.

We also hear from Dylan biographer Howard Sounes and musician and Dylan chronicler Sid Griffin as well as former England cricket captain Bob Willis, who added the name Dylan to his forenames and has seen Dylan live around fifty times.

In 1969, Dylan returned with a new album, a new sound and new look.

Bob Dylan -Changing Times:1969:Nashville Skyline.

Having been out of the public eye for quite some time, Bob Dylan returned in 1969 with a new album, a new sound and new look.

6M021979, Slow Train Coming2010071120110525

In 1979, Dylan embraced Christianity and recorded a gospel album.

John Wilson looks back to 1979 when once again Bob Dylan marked the end of a decade by making some major changes in his life and career.

He embraced Christianity, spent several months in Bible School and recorded a Gospel album, Slow Train Coming.

When he tried to evangelize Jerry Wexler in the studio, the wily producer replied 'Bob, you're dealing with a sixty-two-year-old confirmed Jewish atheist.

I'm hopeless.

Let's just make an album'.

To the frustration of some of his fans, subsequent concerts were all-Gospel events.

Dylan refused to play any of his old material, tended to give sermons between songs - even dismissing hecklers who demanded rock-n-roll with the words.

'You wanna rock-n-roll you can go down and rock-n-roll.

You can go see Kiss and you rock-n-roll all your way down to the pit.'.

John Wilson presents Bob Dylan's 1979's Gospel-tinged album Slow Train Coming.

In 1979 Bob Dylan once again marked the end of a decade by making some major changes in his life and career.

To the frustration of some of his fans, subsequent concerts were all-Gospel events, and Dylan refused to play any of his old material, tending to give sermons between songs.

6M021979, Slow Train Coming2010071120110525

In 1979, Dylan embraced Christianity and recorded a gospel album.

John Wilson looks back to 1979 when once again Bob Dylan marked the end of a decade by making some major changes in his life and career.

He embraced Christianity, spent several months in Bible School and recorded a Gospel album, Slow Train Coming.

When he tried to evangelize Jerry Wexler in the studio, the wily producer replied 'Bob, you're dealing with a sixty-two-year-old confirmed Jewish atheist.

I'm hopeless.

Let's just make an album'.

To the frustration of some of his fans, subsequent concerts were all-Gospel events.

Dylan refused to play any of his old material, tended to give sermons between songs - even dismissing hecklers who demanded rock-n-roll with the words.

'You wanna rock-n-roll you can go down and rock-n-roll.

You can go see Kiss and you rock-n-roll all your way down to the pit.'.

John Wilson presents Bob Dylan's 1979's Gospel-tinged album Slow Train Coming.

In 1979 Bob Dylan once again marked the end of a decade by making some major changes in his life and career.

To the frustration of some of his fans, subsequent concerts were all-Gospel events, and Dylan refused to play any of his old material, tending to give sermons between songs.

6M031989, Oh Mercy2010071220110526

Bob records with Daniel Lanois in New Orleans and continues his 'never-ending tour'.

John Wilson continues to explore Bob Dylan's career at the end of three decades - 1969, 1979 and 1989 - and, with the help of those who have worked with and written about the enigmatic star, assesses the ways in which he re-invented himself at those times.

Tonight John looks back at 1989 and the album Oh Mercy, which was seen as a comeback and was the first album Dylan had written entirely himself for four years.

Recorded in an imposing house in New Orleans and produced by Daniel Lanois (who had been recommended to Dylan by Bono), it was a return to form.

Dylan also stepped up his touring schedule, clocking up ninety nine concerts - an average he has kept up more or less every year since then on what he described as his 'never-ending' tour.

John Wilson presents Bob Dylan's - Oh Mercy.

Bob Dylan's Oh Mercy was seen as a comeback and was the first album he had written entirely himself for four years.

At this time Dylan also stepped up his touring schedule, clocking up ninety nine concerts, what he described since then as his 'never-ending' tour.

6M031989, Oh Mercy2010071220110526

Bob records with Daniel Lanois in New Orleans and continues his 'never-ending tour'.

John Wilson continues to explore Bob Dylan's career at the end of three decades - 1969, 1979 and 1989 - and, with the help of those who have worked with and written about the enigmatic star, assesses the ways in which he re-invented himself at those times.

Tonight John looks back at 1989 and the album Oh Mercy, which was seen as a comeback and was the first album Dylan had written entirely himself for four years.

Recorded in an imposing house in New Orleans and produced by Daniel Lanois (who had been recommended to Dylan by Bono), it was a return to form.

Dylan also stepped up his touring schedule, clocking up ninety nine concerts - an average he has kept up more or less every year since then on what he described as his 'never-ending' tour.

John Wilson presents Bob Dylan's - Oh Mercy.

Bob Dylan's Oh Mercy was seen as a comeback and was the first album he had written entirely himself for four years.

At this time Dylan also stepped up his touring schedule, clocking up ninety nine concerts, what he described since then as his 'never-ending' tour.

6M04 LAST20110527

John Wilson chairs a discussion on Dylan's evolution through the noughties.

John Wilson and guests David Hepworth, Eamonn Forde and Paul Farley discuss Dylan's past decade, his legacy and what the future might hold.

First broadcast in 2009.

6M04 LAST20110527

John Wilson chairs a discussion on Dylan's evolution through the noughties.

John Wilson and guests David Hepworth, Eamonn Forde and Paul Farley discuss Dylan's past decade, his legacy and what the future might hold.

First broadcast in 2009.