Blue Skies

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Broadcast
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Programme Catalogue - Details: 03 February 199619960203

Producer: S. RAFFAN

Next in series: 24 February 1996

Previous in series: 13 January 1996

Description

Steve JONES presents another in series that bridges the gap between art and

Subject Categories

science programmes (genre)

arts programmes (genre)

automata

Broadcast history

03 Feb 1996 21:40-22:10 (RADIO 3)

Contributors

Steve Jones

Sandy Raffan (Producer)

John Gray (Speaker)

David Keating (Speaker)

Stelarc (Speaker)

Jasia Reichardt (Speaker)

Felix Hess (Speaker)

Barbara Webb (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-02-02.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 03 February 199619960203

Producer: S. RAFFAN

Next in series: 24 February 1996

Previous in series: 13 January 1996

Description

Steve JONES presents another in series that bridges the gap between art and

Subject Categories

science programmes (genre)

arts programmes (genre)

automata

Broadcast history

03 Feb 1996 21:40-22:10 (RADIO 3)

Contributors

Steve Jones

Sandy Raffan (Producer)

John Gray (Speaker)

David Keating (Speaker)

Stelarc (Speaker)

Jasia Reichardt (Speaker)

Felix Hess (Speaker)

Barbara Webb (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-02-02.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 January 199619960113

Producer: D. COHEN

Next in series: 03 February 1996

Previous in series: MAGNETISM

Broadcast history

13 Jan 1996 22:00-22:30 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-12.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 January 199619960113

Producer: D. COHEN

Next in series: 03 February 1996

Previous in series: MAGNETISM

Broadcast history

13 Jan 1996 22:00-22:30 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-12.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 24 February 199619960224

Producer: R. ADEY

Next in series: 23 March 1996

Previous in series: 03 February 1996

Broadcast history

24 Feb 1996 22:00-22:30 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-23.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 24 February 199619960224

Producer: R. ADEY

Next in series: 23 March 1996

Previous in series: 03 February 1996

Broadcast history

24 Feb 1996 22:00-22:30 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-23.

02The Right Size20000410

Georgina Ferry explores scientific developments in a cultural context. 2: `The Right Size'. Astronomers and molecular biologists bring the very large and the very small within our reach. What are the aesthetic and scientific qualities of such images?

02The Right Size20000410

Georgina Ferry explores scientific developments in a cultural context. 2: `The Right Size'. Astronomers and molecular biologists bring the very large and the very small within our reach. What are the aesthetic and scientific qualities of such images?

03Models And Movement20000416

Georgina Ferry explores scientific developments in a cultural context. 3: `Models and Movement'. Why do scientists always feel the need to make 3-D models of their subjects? Many historical examples are now recognised for their beauty, but are the aesthetic qualities of these models important to the scientists?

03Models And Movement20000416

Georgina Ferry explores scientific developments in a cultural context. 3: `Models and Movement'. Why do scientists always feel the need to make 3-D models of their subjects? Many historical examples are now recognised for their beauty, but are the aesthetic qualities of these models important to the scientists?

04Restoration And Reconstruction20000424

Georgina Ferry explores scientific developments in a cultural context. 4: `Restoration and Reconstruction'. How scientists work with artists to create the dinosaurs and early humans we see on TV and film. Do these images help or hinder our understanding of the past?

04Restoration And Reconstruction20000424

Georgina Ferry explores scientific developments in a cultural context. 4: `Restoration and Reconstruction'. How scientists work with artists to create the dinosaurs and early humans we see on TV and film. Do these images help or hinder our understanding of the past?

05Reproduction And Replication20000501

Georgina Ferry explores scientific developments in a cultural context. 5: `Reproduction and Replication'. How faithfully can we recapture a visual image or a three-dimensional object?

05Reproduction And Replication20000501

Georgina Ferry explores scientific developments in a cultural context. 5: `Reproduction and Replication'. How faithfully can we recapture a visual image or a three-dimensional object?

06Icon And Inspiration20000507

Georgina Ferry presents the last the series exploring scientific developments in a cultural context. 6: `Icon and Inspiration'. More and more scientific images and terminology are becoming absorbed into contemporary culture, and artists continue to want to interpret scientifice ideas. What do we gain from this synthesis?

06Icon And Inspiration20000507

Georgina Ferry presents the last the series exploring scientific developments in a cultural context. 6: `Icon and Inspiration'. More and more scientific images and terminology are becoming absorbed into contemporary culture, and artists continue to want to interpret scientifice ideas. What do we gain from this synthesis?

197D0119971025

Steve Jones returns with the programme that bridges the gulf between the arts and sciences.

In the first of four programmes, he explores the 16th century.

This century saw the first atlas, secular part songs by Thomas Tallis and the discovery by Gallileo that the acceleration due to gravity was the same for a feather and a stone.

197D0119971025

Steve Jones returns with the programme that bridges the gulf between the arts and sciences.

In the first of four programmes, he explores the 16th century.

This century saw the first atlas, secular part songs by Thomas Tallis and the discovery by Gallileo that the acceleration due to gravity was the same for a feather and a stone.

197D02The Laughing Cavalier19971101

In the second of four programmes bridging the gulf between the arts and sciences, Steve Jones explores the 17th century.

In this century, Galileo invented the telescope, Frans Hals painted `The Laughing Cavalier' and Newton developed his law of universal gravitation.

197D02The Laughing Cavalier19971101

In the second of four programmes bridging the gulf between the arts and sciences, Steve Jones explores the 17th century.

In this century, Galileo invented the telescope, Frans Hals painted `The Laughing Cavalier' and Newton developed his law of universal gravitation.

197D03The Rivals19971108

In the third of four programmes bridging the gulf between the arts and sciences, Steve Jones explores the 18th century.

In this century, Linnaeus introduced the classification system for all living organisms, Richard Brinsley Sheridan wrote `The Rivals', and John Harrison's chronometer led to accurate measurement of longitude.

197D03The Rivals19971108

In the third of four programmes bridging the gulf between the arts and sciences, Steve Jones explores the 18th century.

In this century, Linnaeus introduced the classification system for all living organisms, Richard Brinsley Sheridan wrote `The Rivals', and John Harrison's chronometer led to accurate measurement of longitude.

198C01Origin Of Species19980926

In the first of six programmes, Professor Steve Jones reasses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species' in conversation with scientists and artists.

198C01Origin Of Species19980926

In the first of six programmes, Professor Steve Jones reasses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species' in conversation with scientists and artists.

198C01Origin Of Species19981010

The third of six programmes in which Professor Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

`Struggle'.

Tennyson's famous description of `nature red in tooth and claw' predated `Origin of Species' by almost a decade - but it was Charles Darwin who realised that the brutal struggle that seems to characterise animals' lives is the driving force of evolution.

Does all great creation result from struggle, or is this the oldest artistic cliche in the book? Professor Steve Jones investigates.

198C01Origin Of Species19981010

The third of six programmes in which Professor Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

`Struggle'.

Tennyson's famous description of `nature red in tooth and claw' predated `Origin of Species' by almost a decade - but it was Charles Darwin who realised that the brutal struggle that seems to characterise animals' lives is the driving force of evolution.

Does all great creation result from struggle, or is this the oldest artistic cliche in the book? Professor Steve Jones investigates.

198C02Origin Of Species19981003

The second of six programmes in which Professor Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

In this programme, he looks at how natural variation inspired Darwin's work and how deviations from the norm have influenced art and music.

198C02Origin Of Species19981003

The second of six programmes in which Professor Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

In this programme, he looks at how natural variation inspired Darwin's work and how deviations from the norm have influenced art and music.

198C02Origin Of Species19981017

The fourth of six programmes in which Professor Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

`Imprints'.

Why the fossil record and other signs from the past apply to both the natural world and the arts.

198C02Origin Of Species19981017

The fourth of six programmes in which Professor Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

`Imprints'.

Why the fossil record and other signs from the past apply to both the natural world and the arts.

198C03Origin Of Species19981024

The fifth of six programmes in which Professor Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

`Groups within Groups'.

Darwin's pioneering work clarified the natural order of animals and plants and explained how species divide and subdivide through the process of evolution.

Steve Jones meets the researchers who continue to study this subject today and investigates whether such natural group boundaries exist in the arts.

198C03Origin Of Species19981024

The fifth of six programmes in which Professor Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

`Groups within Groups'.

Darwin's pioneering work clarified the natural order of animals and plants and explained how species divide and subdivide through the process of evolution.

Steve Jones meets the researchers who continue to study this subject today and investigates whether such natural group boundaries exist in the arts.

198C06Hybrids19981031

Prof Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

6: `Hybrids'.

When two unlikely bedfellows combine, is the result a uneasy mishmash which is neither fish nor fowl? Or are such hybrids exciting products of rigorous and dynamic fusion? Professor Steve Jones looks at hybridisation as it takes place in the arts and in science: from music and cookery to genetic modification and cross-breeding in nature.

198C06Hybrids19981031

Prof Steve Jones assesses the legacy of Charles Darwin's `Origin of Species'.

6: `Hybrids'.

When two unlikely bedfellows combine, is the result a uneasy mishmash which is neither fish nor fowl? Or are such hybrids exciting products of rigorous and dynamic fusion? Professor Steve Jones looks at hybridisation as it takes place in the arts and in science: from music and cookery to genetic modification and cross-breeding in nature.

199B0119990508

Steve Jones returns with the intriguing science magazine which explores areas where science and art meet.

In the first of a series on science in fiction, John Banville, author of novels on Kepler and Copernicus, talks about his sources of inspiration.

How is his work viewed by scientists?

199B0119990508

Steve Jones returns with the intriguing science magazine which explores areas where science and art meet.

In the first of a series on science in fiction, John Banville, author of novels on Kepler and Copernicus, talks about his sources of inspiration.

How is his work viewed by scientists?

199B02The Cloning Of Joanna May19990515

Steve Jones presents the series exploring the boundary between science and art with another programme about science in fiction.

Fay Weldon has been concerned with cloning since she wrote `The Cloning of Joanna May' in the late eighties.

How far has her science fiction been realised by scientific fact?

199B02The Cloning Of Joanna May19990515

Steve Jones presents the series exploring the boundary between science and art with another programme about science in fiction.

Fay Weldon has been concerned with cloning since she wrote `The Cloning of Joanna May' in the late eighties.

How far has her science fiction been realised by scientific fact?

199B03The Birthday Boys19990522

Steve Jones presents the series exploring the boundary between science and art with another programme about science in fiction.

Beryl Bainbridge's novel `The Birthday Boys' is her version of Scott's expedition to the South Pole in 1912.

Steve Jones talks to her about why she was inspired by this scientific expedition and hears from those who follow in Scott's footsteps today.

199B03The Birthday Boys19990522

Steve Jones presents the series exploring the boundary between science and art with another programme about science in fiction.

Beryl Bainbridge's novel `The Birthday Boys' is her version of Scott's expedition to the South Pole in 1912.

Steve Jones talks to her about why she was inspired by this scientific expedition and hears from those who follow in Scott's footsteps today.

199B0419990529

Steve Jones presents the series exploring the boundary between science and art.

In the last of the series about science in fiction, he talks to author Philip Kerr.

It is 2069, and four-fifths of the world is suffering from a virus which can be cured only by a blood transfusion - so blood is power.

Science fiction, or science in fiction?

199B0419990529

Steve Jones presents the series exploring the boundary between science and art.

In the last of the series about science in fiction, he talks to author Philip Kerr.

It is 2069, and four-fifths of the world is suffering from a virus which can be cured only by a blood transfusion - so blood is power.

Science fiction, or science in fiction?

200B01Visualisation20000402

Georgina Ferry looks at scientific developments in a cultural context.

1: `Visualisation'.

Much science depends on making the unseen visible, with techniques such as ultrasound and scanning.

But can such pictures mislead? And why do we need pictures for understanding?

200B01Visualisation20000402

Georgina Ferry looks at scientific developments in a cultural context.

1: `Visualisation'.

Much science depends on making the unseen visible, with techniques such as ultrasound and scanning.

But can such pictures mislead? And why do we need pictures for understanding?