Bitten By The Bug

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
01The Field Trip20111010

In the first of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of society members, Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are in surprisingly good shape.

The first programme takes him to the Somerset Levels with the Botanical Society, where he joins a field meeting studying aquatic plants.

Field trips are the life-blood of any society and a tour of the dykes and ditches produces not only the smallest flowering plant in the UK, but also the largest cells of any British plant.

Presented and Produced by Brett Westwood.

Brett Westwood joins members of the Botanical Society on an aquatic field trip.

01The Field Trip20111010

In the first of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of society members, Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are in surprisingly good shape.

The first programme takes him to the Somerset Levels with the Botanical Society, where he joins a field meeting studying aquatic plants.

Field trips are the life-blood of any society and a tour of the dykes and ditches produces not only the smallest flowering plant in the UK, but also the largest cells of any British plant.

Presented and Produced by Brett Westwood.

Brett Westwood joins members of the Botanical Society on an aquatic field trip.

02The Identification Workshop20111011

In the second of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of their members, Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are it is in surprisingly good shape.

The Dipterist's Forum was established to study the 7000 and more species of two-winged flies which occur in the UK, from bluebottles to mosquitoes.

At a field centre in Shrewsbury he learns how to navigate his way around a fly, pursues winter gnats over a garden compost-heap and gets to grips with the finer points of fungus gnats, a bewildering group of several hundred species most of which are less than 5mm long.

Brett Westwood joins a Dipterists Forum workshop where he learns to identify flies.

02The Identification Workshop20111011

In the second of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of their members, Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are it is in surprisingly good shape.

The Dipterist's Forum was established to study the 7000 and more species of two-winged flies which occur in the UK, from bluebottles to mosquitoes.

At a field centre in Shrewsbury he learns how to navigate his way around a fly, pursues winter gnats over a garden compost-heap and gets to grips with the finer points of fungus gnats, a bewildering group of several hundred species most of which are less than 5mm long.

Brett Westwood joins a Dipterists Forum workshop where he learns to identify flies.

03Bookham Common20111012

In the third of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of their members, Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are in surprisingly good shape.

In 2011 the London Natural History Society celebrates 70 years of studying one place, Bookham Commons in Surrey.

The results of the findings, which include purple emperor butterflies and 1800 species of beetle, have influenced the way the National Trust manages the site for people and wildlife.

Brett joins a beetle hunt with Stuart Cole of the London Natural History Society and Ian Swinney from the National Trust and discovers the jewel-like mint leaf-beetle as well as the value of keeping a donkey on site.

Produced and Presented by Brett Westwood.

Brett Westwood explores Bookham Common with the London Natural History Society.

03Bookham Common20111012

In the third of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of their members, Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are in surprisingly good shape.

In 2011 the London Natural History Society celebrates 70 years of studying one place, Bookham Commons in Surrey.

The results of the findings, which include purple emperor butterflies and 1800 species of beetle, have influenced the way the National Trust manages the site for people and wildlife.

Brett joins a beetle hunt with Stuart Cole of the London Natural History Society and Ian Swinney from the National Trust and discovers the jewel-like mint leaf-beetle as well as the value of keeping a donkey on site.

Produced and Presented by Brett Westwood.

Brett Westwood explores Bookham Common with the London Natural History Society.

04The Bryologists And The Book20111013

In the fourth of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of their members , Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are in surprisingly good shape.

Members of the British Bryological Society study mosses and liverworts and their travels in search of these delicate and very beautiful plants take them into some of the most remote and spectacular landscapes.

Brett joins expert bryologists Mark Lawley and Sam Bosanquet in mid-wales where they find a liverwort called Spotty Fingers, discover the delights of "grotting" and talk about their editorship of a new photographic field guide to mosses and liverworts, an achievement of which the Society is very proud.

Presented and Produced by Brett Westwood.

Brett Westwood bones up on mosses and liverworts with the British Bryological Society.

04The Bryologists And The Book20111013

In the fourth of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of their members , Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are in surprisingly good shape.

Members of the British Bryological Society study mosses and liverworts and their travels in search of these delicate and very beautiful plants take them into some of the most remote and spectacular landscapes.

Brett joins expert bryologists Mark Lawley and Sam Bosanquet in mid-wales where they find a liverwort called Spotty Fingers, discover the delights of "grotting" and talk about their editorship of a new photographic field guide to mosses and liverworts, an achievement of which the Society is very proud.

Presented and Produced by Brett Westwood.

Brett Westwood bones up on mosses and liverworts with the British Bryological Society.

05 LASTSorby And The Future Of Natural History Societies20111014

In the last of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of their members, Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are in surprisingly good shape.

The Sorby Natural History Society, based around Sheffield, is one of the largest and most active such societies in the UK, with groups covering every single aspect of British natural history.

They are particularly keen to encourage the naturalists of the future.

Brett meets Derek Whiteley, the Society's secretary and Val Clinging, the mammal recorder, to discuss the importance of involving as many people as possible in field trips and identification workshops.

One of the highlights of the Sorby calendar is a late-winter count of the local mountain hares which were introduced for hunting in the 19th Century, but have thrived on the moors.

Surrounded by hares and heather, Derek and Val are optimistic about the growth of amateur natural history in the future.

Presented and Produced by Brett Westwood.

Brett Westwood meets mountain hares in Sheffield with the Sorby Natural History Society.

05 LASTSorby And The Future Of Natural History Societies20111014

In the last of this series of five programmes exploring the aims and enthusiasms of their members, Brett Westwood gets to the heart of our natural history societies and finds that here in the UK they are in surprisingly good shape.

The Sorby Natural History Society, based around Sheffield, is one of the largest and most active such societies in the UK, with groups covering every single aspect of British natural history.

They are particularly keen to encourage the naturalists of the future.

Brett meets Derek Whiteley, the Society's secretary and Val Clinging, the mammal recorder, to discuss the importance of involving as many people as possible in field trips and identification workshops.

One of the highlights of the Sorby calendar is a late-winter count of the local mountain hares which were introduced for hunting in the 19th Century, but have thrived on the moors.

Surrounded by hares and heather, Derek and Val are optimistic about the growth of amateur natural history in the future.

Presented and Produced by Brett Westwood.

Brett Westwood meets mountain hares in Sheffield with the Sorby Natural History Society.