Big In Bangalore, Big In Beijing

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012010050820160118 (BBC7)
20160119 (BBC7)

Rajan Datar follows heavy metal band Iron Maiden to India.

Rajan Datar follows Iron Maiden to India to seek out opportunities for Western music.

With the collapse of The Iron Curtain in the 1980s, a new frontier was open for Western Music acts to exploit. For years, fans in Eastern Europe had been starved of live performances by Western bands and singers due to the difficulties involved in trying to perform in countries cut off by ideology and politics. So where is the new frontier now? Perhaps bands should look east? With the rise of India and China as economic powerhouses, complete with growing middle classes, are these now the new territories for bands and artists to target as they seek new audiences and revenue streams?

Presenter Rajan Datar follows legendary British band Iron Maiden as they head to Bangalore for a sold out festival appearance. With exclusive access Rajan hangs out backstage with singer Bruce Dickinson, who not only fronts the band, but is also the pilot of the specially-converted plane which they use to travel the world whilst on tour. He speaks to the promoters who are trying to make India the new destination of choice for Western music artists and hears from fans who have travelled for days from all parts of the sub continent to be at the concert. He also discovers, with surprising results, which musical genres sell in India and which don't.

The producer is Tim Mansel. This is a Bite Yer Legs production for BBC Radio 4.

1/2

With the collapse of The Iron Curtain in the 1980s, a new frontier was open for Western Music acts to exploit.

For years, fans in Eastern Europe had been starved of live performances by Western bands and singers due to the difficulties involved in trying to perform in countries cut off by ideology and politics.

So where is the new frontier now? Perhaps bands should look east? With the rise of India and China as economic powerhouses, complete with growing middle classes, are these now the new territories for bands and artists to target as they seek new audiences and revenue streams?

Presenter Rajan Datar follows legendary British band Iron Maiden as they head to Bangalore for a sold out festival appearance.

With exclusive access Rajan hangs out backstage with singer Bruce Dickinson, who not only fronts the band, but is also the pilot of the specially-converted plane which they use to travel the world whilst on tour.

He speaks to the promoters who are trying to make India the new destination of choice for Western music artists and hears from fans who have travelled for days from all parts of the sub continent to be at the concert.

He also discovers, with surprising results, which musical genres sell in India and which don't.

The producer is Tim Mansel.

This is a Bite Yer Legs production for BBC Radio 4.

012010050820160118 (BBC7)
20160119 (BBC7)

Rajan Datar follows heavy metal band Iron Maiden to India.

Rajan Datar follows Iron Maiden to India to seek out opportunities for Western music.

With the collapse of The Iron Curtain in the 1980s, a new frontier was open for Western Music acts to exploit. For years, fans in Eastern Europe had been starved of live performances by Western bands and singers due to the difficulties involved in trying to perform in countries cut off by ideology and politics. So where is the new frontier now? Perhaps bands should look east? With the rise of India and China as economic powerhouses, complete with growing middle classes, are these now the new territories for bands and artists to target as they seek new audiences and revenue streams?

Presenter Rajan Datar follows legendary British band Iron Maiden as they head to Bangalore for a sold out festival appearance. With exclusive access Rajan hangs out backstage with singer Bruce Dickinson, who not only fronts the band, but is also the pilot of the specially-converted plane which they use to travel the world whilst on tour. He speaks to the promoters who are trying to make India the new destination of choice for Western music artists and hears from fans who have travelled for days from all parts of the sub continent to be at the concert. He also discovers, with surprising results, which musical genres sell in India and which don't.

The producer is Tim Mansel. This is a Bite Yer Legs production for BBC Radio 4.

1/2

With the collapse of The Iron Curtain in the 1980s, a new frontier was open for Western Music acts to exploit.

For years, fans in Eastern Europe had been starved of live performances by Western bands and singers due to the difficulties involved in trying to perform in countries cut off by ideology and politics.

So where is the new frontier now? Perhaps bands should look east? With the rise of India and China as economic powerhouses, complete with growing middle classes, are these now the new territories for bands and artists to target as they seek new audiences and revenue streams?

Presenter Rajan Datar follows legendary British band Iron Maiden as they head to Bangalore for a sold out festival appearance.

With exclusive access Rajan hangs out backstage with singer Bruce Dickinson, who not only fronts the band, but is also the pilot of the specially-converted plane which they use to travel the world whilst on tour.

He speaks to the promoters who are trying to make India the new destination of choice for Western music artists and hears from fans who have travelled for days from all parts of the sub continent to be at the concert.

He also discovers, with surprising results, which musical genres sell in India and which don't.

The producer is Tim Mansel.

This is a Bite Yer Legs production for BBC Radio 4.

02 LAST2010051520160119 (BBC7)
20160120 (BBC7)

Rajan Datar heads to Beijing to see if developing economies offer riches for western music

Rajan Datar follows Iron Maiden to India to seek out opportunities for Western music.

Are the new economies of India and China ripe for Western music acts to exploit? Rajan heads to Beijing to find out why China is another market western bands are targeting. With a growing, affluent middle class bands ranging from Mumford and Sons to Shakira are heading to the Far East in the hope of breaking this huge country.

However, touring China is not an easy proposition for bands.

On his travels Rajan discovers a litany of problems for bands trying to become popular in China. Tickets can often be expensive, especially if a band is not popular enough to play stadium venues. Then there is Government censorship - one festival had to drop all the foreign artists on the bill after it was discovered one of the bands, The Buzzcocks, once had some songs banned in the UK back in the 1970s.

Then there is the local police who can cancel gigs on a whim and an audience who have few cultural links to the West and are still relatively isolated from Western culture.

Rajan also discovers why the Icelandic singer Bjork has made touring China even harder for Western bands, and hears from the strange French band trying to tour this huge country, complete with all their instruments and equipment, using the rail network.

The producer is Tim Mansel, and this is a Bite Yer legs production for BBC Radio 4.

Are the new economies of India and China ripe for Western music acts to exploit? Rajan heads to Beijing to find out why China is another market western bands are targeting.

With a growing, affluent middle class bands ranging from Mumford and Sons to Shakira are heading to the Far East in the hope of breaking this huge country.

On his travels Rajan discovers a litany of problems for bands trying to become popular in China.

Tickets can often be expensive, especially if a band is not popular enough to play stadium venues.

Then there is Government censorship - one festival had to drop all the foreign artists on the bill after it was discovered one of the bands, The Buzzcocks, once had some songs banned in the UK back in the 1970s.

02 LAST2010051520160119 (BBC7)
20160120 (BBC7)

Rajan Datar heads to Beijing to see if developing economies offer riches for western music

Rajan Datar follows Iron Maiden to India to seek out opportunities for Western music.

Are the new economies of India and China ripe for Western music acts to exploit? Rajan heads to Beijing to find out why China is another market western bands are targeting. With a growing, affluent middle class bands ranging from Mumford and Sons to Shakira are heading to the Far East in the hope of breaking this huge country.

However, touring China is not an easy proposition for bands.

On his travels Rajan discovers a litany of problems for bands trying to become popular in China. Tickets can often be expensive, especially if a band is not popular enough to play stadium venues. Then there is Government censorship - one festival had to drop all the foreign artists on the bill after it was discovered one of the bands, The Buzzcocks, once had some songs banned in the UK back in the 1970s.

Then there is the local police who can cancel gigs on a whim and an audience who have few cultural links to the West and are still relatively isolated from Western culture.

Rajan also discovers why the Icelandic singer Bjork has made touring China even harder for Western bands, and hears from the strange French band trying to tour this huge country, complete with all their instruments and equipment, using the rail network.

The producer is Tim Mansel, and this is a Bite Yer legs production for BBC Radio 4.

Are the new economies of India and China ripe for Western music acts to exploit? Rajan heads to Beijing to find out why China is another market western bands are targeting.

With a growing, affluent middle class bands ranging from Mumford and Sons to Shakira are heading to the Far East in the hope of breaking this huge country.

On his travels Rajan discovers a litany of problems for bands trying to become popular in China.

Tickets can often be expensive, especially if a band is not popular enough to play stadium venues.

Then there is Government censorship - one festival had to drop all the foreign artists on the bill after it was discovered one of the bands, The Buzzcocks, once had some songs banned in the UK back in the 1970s.