Beyond This Life

Episodes

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01

0120091018

Tim Gardam, Principal of St Anne's College, Oxford, confronts our response to death in 21st-century Britain.

He reflects on how we deal with death as a society and considers the relationship between those who have gone and those who are left behind.

Most people can remember their first funeral - everyone can remember the first time they saw someone who had died.

But how we respond to death and our own mortality varies greatly in multicultural Britain?

Two teenagers face the unexpected death of their schoolfriend and seek the comfort of an afterlife despite not believing in God.

And a 70-year-old British Hindu takes his fight to have an open funeral pyre to the High Court, believing that, if he doesn't, his soul will haunt those left behind.

Two teenagers face the unexpected death of their schoolfriend.

0120091018

Tim Gardam, Principal of St Anne's College, Oxford, confronts our response to death in 21st-century Britain.

He reflects on how we deal with death as a society and considers the relationship between those who have gone and those who are left behind.

Most people can remember their first funeral - everyone can remember the first time they saw someone who had died.

But how we respond to death and our own mortality varies greatly in multicultural Britain?

Two teenagers face the unexpected death of their schoolfriend and seek the comfort of an afterlife despite not believing in God.

And a 70-year-old British Hindu takes his fight to have an open funeral pyre to the High Court, believing that, if he doesn't, his soul will haunt those left behind.

Two teenagers face the unexpected death of their schoolfriend.

Tim Gardam, Principal of St Anne's College, Oxford, confronts our response to death in 21st-century Britain.

He reflects on how we deal with death as a society and considers the relationship between those who have gone and those who are left behind.

Most people can remember their first funeral - everyone can remember the first time they saw someone who had died.

But how we respond to death and our own mortality varies greatly in multicultural Britain?

Two teenagers face the unexpected death of their schoolfriend and seek the comfort of an afterlife despite not believing in God.

And a 70-year-old British Hindu takes his fight to have an open funeral pyre to the High Court, believing that, if he doesn't, his soul will haunt those left behind.

Two teenagers face the unexpected death of their schoolfriend.

02

02 LAST20091025

Tim Gardam, Principal of St Anne's College, Oxford, confronts our response to death in 21st-century Britain.

He reflects on how we deal with death as a society and considers the relationship between those who have gone and those who are left behind.

Most people can remember their first funeral; everyone can remember the first time they saw someone who had died.

But how we respond to death and our own mortality varies greatly in multicultural Britain?

Tim finds that having a keepsake of your loved one goes far beyond a lock of hair.

He attends the National Funeral Exhibition and encounters an industry where physical immortality is now marketed as a desirable commodity to those who have lost their belief in life after death but who are terrified of oblivion.

Human ashes are made into paperweights and an umbilical cord is made into a diamond.

Tim Gardam visits the National Funeral Exhibition.

02 LAST20091025

Tim Gardam, Principal of St Anne's College, Oxford, confronts our response to death in 21st-century Britain.

He reflects on how we deal with death as a society and considers the relationship between those who have gone and those who are left behind.

Most people can remember their first funeral; everyone can remember the first time they saw someone who had died.

But how we respond to death and our own mortality varies greatly in multicultural Britain?

Tim finds that having a keepsake of your loved one goes far beyond a lock of hair.

He attends the National Funeral Exhibition and encounters an industry where physical immortality is now marketed as a desirable commodity to those who have lost their belief in life after death but who are terrified of oblivion.

Human ashes are made into paperweights and an umbilical cord is made into a diamond.

Tim Gardam visits the National Funeral Exhibition.

Tim Gardam, Principal of St Anne's College, Oxford, confronts our response to death in 21st-century Britain.

He reflects on how we deal with death as a society and considers the relationship between those who have gone and those who are left behind.

Most people can remember their first funeral; everyone can remember the first time they saw someone who had died.

But how we respond to death and our own mortality varies greatly in multicultural Britain?

Tim finds that having a keepsake of your loved one goes far beyond a lock of hair.

He attends the National Funeral Exhibition and encounters an industry where physical immortality is now marketed as a desirable commodity to those who have lost their belief in life after death but who are terrified of oblivion.

Human ashes are made into paperweights and an umbilical cord is made into a diamond.

Tim Gardam visits the National Funeral Exhibition.

120091018
2 LAST20091025