Between Ourselves

Olivia O'leary talks to two people who have had similar experiences.

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Episodes

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19990413

In this programme, two surrogate mothers discuss the experience and the ethics of having a baby for a childless couple.

19990413

In this programme, two surrogate mothers discuss the experience and the ethics of having a baby for a childless couple.

19990420

Lord Strathclyde, a hereditary peer, and Lord Hunt, a new life peer, discuss their different perspectives on the House of Lords.

19990420

Lord Strathclyde, a hereditary peer, and Lord Hunt, a new life peer, discuss their different perspectives on the House of Lords.

19990427

Olivia O'leary talks to two people who have had similar experiences.

Mountaineers Simon Yates and Mark Whetu have both made the agonising decision to abandon a climbing partner on a mountain.

Mountaineers Simon Yates and Mark Whetu have both made the agonising decision to abandon a climbing partner on a mountain.

19990427

Olivia O'leary talks to two people who have had similar experiences.

Mountaineers Simon Yates and Mark Whetu have both made the agonising decision to abandon a climbing partner on a mountain.

Mountaineers Simon Yates and Mark Whetu have both made the agonising decision to abandon a climbing partner on a mountain.

19990518

Sylvia Clark and Jim Banks both lost relatives through suicide.

They discuss the complex emotional legacy.

19990518

Sylvia Clark and Jim Banks both lost relatives through suicide.

They discuss the complex emotional legacy.

19990525

Psychologist Dr Julian Boon and PSYCHIATRIST Dr Richard Badcock discuss how profiling can help solve crimes.

19990525

Psychologist Dr Julian Boon and PSYCHIATRIST Dr Richard Badcock discuss how profiling can help solve crimes.

19990601

Esther Lenehan and Douglas Kennedy are foreigners who chose to live in ENGLAND.

What do they make of the ENGLISH?

19990601

Esther Lenehan and Douglas Kennedy are foreigners who chose to live in ENGLAND.

What do they make of the ENGLISH?

20080717

Two spouses of transsexuals discuss how they have coped with their partners' gender transition.

20080717

Two spouses of transsexuals discuss how they have coped with their partners' gender transition.

20080731

Olivia O'leary presents the series which brings together two people who have had profound and similar experiences, to hear their individual stories and compare the long-term effects on each of their lives.

Yasmin is a British-born Pakistani who has fallen in love with a non-Muslim man.

Janet left her husband for a woman.

Both have felt huge pressure to keep their relationships secret.

20080731

Olivia O'leary presents the series which brings together two people who have had profound and similar experiences, to hear their individual stories and compare the long-term effects on each of their lives.

Yasmin is a British-born Pakistani who has fallen in love with a non-Muslim man.

Janet left her husband for a woman.

Both have felt huge pressure to keep their relationships secret.

20080807

City traders Roger Hanbury and Charles deRoeper discuss the highs and lows of their heady occupation.

20080807

City traders Roger Hanbury and Charles deRoeper discuss the highs and lows of their heady occupation.

20080821
20080821
20081014

Tony Little, the headteacher of Eton and Michael Wilkins, headteacher of Outwood Grange, a huge comprehensive school, offer an illuminating comparison between two very different institutions.

20081014

Tony Little, the headteacher of Eton and Michael Wilkins, headteacher of Outwood Grange, a huge comprehensive school, offer an illuminating comparison between two very different institutions.

* *20080814

Circus owners Martin Burton and John Hayes discuss the romance, danger, excitement and difficulties of their profession.

* *20080814

Circus owners Martin Burton and John Hayes discuss the romance, danger, excitement and difficulties of their profession.

* *20080828

Two celebrity photographers discuss life at the business-end of a long lens.

* *20080828

Two celebrity photographers discuss life at the business-end of a long lens.

* *20080904

Former Prime Ministers John Major and Garret FitzGerald discuss life after power.

* *20080904

Former Prime Ministers John Major and Garret FitzGerald discuss life after power.

06Judges20070710

are among the most powerful people in the country - literally able to take the law into their own hands.

Must they possess infinite wisdom and an unfailing confidence in their own judgement? Olivia places two senior judges in the witness box.

06Judges20070710

are among the most powerful people in the country - literally able to take the law into their own hands.

Must they possess infinite wisdom and an unfailing confidence in their own judgement? Olivia places two senior judges in the witness box.

0720070717

Having discovered they had been adopted, Jonathan Rendall and Stephen Francis set out to trace their birth mothers.

As they explain, the experience was almost entirely disastrous, unleashing emotional turmoil and damaging relationships with their adoptive parents along the way.

0720070717

Having discovered they had been adopted, Jonathan Rendall and Stephen Francis set out to trace their birth mothers.

As they explain, the experience was almost entirely disastrous, unleashing emotional turmoil and damaging relationships with their adoptive parents along the way.

0820070724

Two of the world's most eminent facial surgeons discuss the finer points of their work.

0820070724

Two of the world's most eminent facial surgeons discuss the finer points of their work.

040120090805

Olivia talks to two stand-up comedians, probably the UK's first female Muslim stand-up, Shazia Mirza, and doctor, Paul Sinha.

They discuss how they got into comedy and if the pigeon-holes they have been put into of being 'Asian', Muslim' or 'gay' are a help or a hindrance to them.

040120090805

Olivia talks to two stand-up comedians, probably the UK's first female Muslim stand-up, Shazia Mirza, and doctor, Paul Sinha.

They discuss how they got into comedy and if the pigeon-holes they have been put into of being 'Asian', Muslim' or 'gay' are a help or a hindrance to them.

040220090812

Olivia talks to two soldiers who were injured abroad.

David Hart was sent to Afghanistan in 2003 to serve with his Territorial Army unit.

One day he was involved with his regular convoy duties - escorting a bomb-disposal team - when was caught up in a suicide car bomb attack.

He suffered multiple injuries, including the near-amputation of one arm.

Albert Thomson was serving in Iraq with the Black Watch in 2003.

He was returning from collecting a fatally-injured soldier when he was hit by 'friendly fire' which hit him in both legs.

His injuries were so severe his left leg was amputated.

David and Albert tell their stories to Olivia and discuss the impact their injuries have had financially, physically and psychologically.

040220090812

Olivia talks to two soldiers who were injured abroad.

David Hart was sent to Afghanistan in 2003 to serve with his Territorial Army unit.

One day he was involved with his regular convoy duties - escorting a bomb-disposal team - when was caught up in a suicide car bomb attack.

He suffered multiple injuries, including the near-amputation of one arm.

Albert Thomson was serving in Iraq with the Black Watch in 2003.

He was returning from collecting a fatally-injured soldier when he was hit by 'friendly fire' which hit him in both legs.

His injuries were so severe his left leg was amputated.

David and Albert tell their stories to Olivia and discuss the impact their injuries have had financially, physically and psychologically.

040320090819

Olivia talks to two chefs about their careers: Michael Caines, a Michelin-starred chef who lost his right arm in a car accident, and Irish chef Darina Allen, who runs the famous Ballymaloe cookery school in Cork.

They reveal their worst days in the kitchen - involving an undercooked duck and a temperamental French chef with a cold - and discuss how fine restaurants can survive in the recession.

040320090819

Olivia talks to two chefs about their careers: Michael Caines, a Michelin-starred chef who lost his right arm in a car accident, and Irish chef Darina Allen, who runs the famous Ballymaloe cookery school in Cork.

They reveal their worst days in the kitchen - involving an undercooked duck and a temperamental French chef with a cold - and discuss how fine restaurants can survive in the recession.

040420090826

Olivia talks to two barristers, prosecutor Nicholas Hilliard and defence lawayer Dexter Dias, about whether justice can be bought by getting a good barrister, if their reputation for arrogance is deserved and the cases that still haunt them.

040420090826

Olivia talks to two barristers, prosecutor Nicholas Hilliard and defence lawayer Dexter Dias, about whether justice can be bought by getting a good barrister, if their reputation for arrogance is deserved and the cases that still haunt them.

040520090902

Olivia talks to two personal columnists, Katherine Whitehorn, who wrote for The Observer, and Liz Jones, who writes for You magazine.

They discuss when getting personal is too personal, how their friends and families react to being written about and what the changing face of columns in the last 50 years tells us about women's lives.

040520090902

Olivia talks to two personal columnists, Katherine Whitehorn, who wrote for The Observer, and Liz Jones, who writes for You magazine.

They discuss when getting personal is too personal, how their friends and families react to being written about and what the changing face of columns in the last 50 years tells us about women's lives.

040620090909
040620090909
0406 LAST20090909

Olivia talks to two women who were raped by men they met on a night out and asks why conviction rates in the UK are so low compared with the rest of Europe.

0406 LAST20090909

Olivia talks to two women who were raped by men they met on a night out and asks why conviction rates in the UK are so low compared with the rest of Europe.

050120100323

Olivia O'leary talks to two women who both went completely blind in a matter of weeks.

Olivia O'leary presents the series which brings together two people who have had profound and similar experiences, to hear their individual stories and compare the long-term effects on each of their lives.

Two women who went completely blind in a matter of weeks tell their stories.

Julie Coakley was studying art as a mature student when what she describes as 'man flu' laid her low for a couple of weeks.

One day she collapsed and was rushed to hospital, where she was diagnosed with meningitis.

As a result she completely lost her sight and some of her hearing.

At the age of 19, Jill Daley was living in Switzerland, working as an au pair, when complications with diabetes began to interfere with her vision.

Very quickly her sight was completely destroyed.

Jill has had 14 years to adjust to her sight loss, while Julie is just two years into her journey.

Both discuss the impact that going blind has had on them and their families.

Have they been able to embrace the 'blind world'? How have they coped practically and psychologically with this huge upheaval? What have been the biggest challenges?

050120100323

Olivia O'leary talks to two women who both went completely blind in a matter of weeks.

Olivia O'leary presents the series which brings together two people who have had profound and similar experiences, to hear their individual stories and compare the long-term effects on each of their lives.

Two women who went completely blind in a matter of weeks tell their stories.

Julie Coakley was studying art as a mature student when what she describes as 'man flu' laid her low for a couple of weeks.

One day she collapsed and was rushed to hospital, where she was diagnosed with meningitis.

As a result she completely lost her sight and some of her hearing.

At the age of 19, Jill Daley was living in Switzerland, working as an au pair, when complications with diabetes began to interfere with her vision.

Very quickly her sight was completely destroyed.

Jill has had 14 years to adjust to her sight loss, while Julie is just two years into her journey.

Both discuss the impact that going blind has had on them and their families.

Have they been able to embrace the 'blind world'? How have they coped practically and psychologically with this huge upheaval? What have been the biggest challenges?

050220100330

Olivia O'leary talks to an Iraqi Kurd and an Iranian Azeri about being refugees in the UK.

An Iraqi Kurd and an Iranian Azeri discuss their lives as refugees in the United Kingdom.

Mohamed (from Iran) became a refugee in 2009, while Zirak was granted refugee status in 2002 and now has British citizenship.

What is it like to leave family and friends behind in your home country, possibly never to return? Have you put them in danger by leaving? Is it easy to settle in the UK?

Zirak was involved with an organisation that wanted a free Kurdistan.

When the group was discovered, two of his friends were arrested and one subsequently died.

He started receiving threatening letters and knew he had to leave.

He left in 2002 and, from Turkey, was smuggled out in a lorry.

When he eventually arrived in the UK, he didn't know what country he was in, and couldn't speak any English.

Mohamed travelled here to study music and became involved with Azeri politics; friends back home were arrested as a result, and he began to realise that he, too, would be arrested if he returned.

He applied for refugee status, which was granted extremely quickly - it was just a month before he was told he had leave to remain for five years.

He hopes to return home one day.

050220100330

Olivia O'leary talks to an Iraqi Kurd and an Iranian Azeri about being refugees in the UK.

An Iraqi Kurd and an Iranian Azeri discuss their lives as refugees in the United Kingdom.

Mohamed (from Iran) became a refugee in 2009, while Zirak was granted refugee status in 2002 and now has British citizenship.

What is it like to leave family and friends behind in your home country, possibly never to return? Have you put them in danger by leaving? Is it easy to settle in the UK?

Zirak was involved with an organisation that wanted a free Kurdistan.

When the group was discovered, two of his friends were arrested and one subsequently died.

He started receiving threatening letters and knew he had to leave.

He left in 2002 and, from Turkey, was smuggled out in a lorry.

When he eventually arrived in the UK, he didn't know what country he was in, and couldn't speak any English.

Mohamed travelled here to study music and became involved with Azeri politics; friends back home were arrested as a result, and he began to realise that he, too, would be arrested if he returned.

He applied for refugee status, which was granted extremely quickly - it was just a month before he was told he had leave to remain for five years.

He hopes to return home one day.

0503Coroners20100406

Olivia O'leary is joined by two coroners, who discuss what their jobs involve.

This week on Between Ourselves Olivia O'leary is joined in conversation by two Coroners: Peter Dean and Christopher Dorries.

The job of the Coroner is commonly misunderstood; they don't conduct post-mortems or attend crime scenes, as Christopher Dorries says the average member of the public will see more dead bodies than I do".

Rather their role - if a death is sudden or unexplained - is to investigate the cause of death.

Together they discuss what their jobs entail.

On a personal level, how does continually dealing with death and bereavement affect them? What improvements can the recommendations they make during inquests have in wider society? And what problems do very high profile inquests raise? - One of Peter Dean's most public inquests was that of Myra Hindley, he recalls the special circumstances surrounding that.

On a wider scale, with the new Coroners and Justice Act coming into force, will there be greater pressure to hold inquests in secret? And will the appointment of a Chief Coroner for the first time lead to better funding and therefore a better and more consistent service offered to bereaved families? Peter Dean is damning in his criticism of one of the areas he represents (South East Essex) claiming that mismanagement has led to cancelled viewings of bodies and delayed funerals.

Join Olivia O'leary to get in the inside track on the unique role of the Coroner on Between Ourselves.

Christopher Dorries is the Coroner for South Yorkshire West.

Peter Dean is the Coroner for Suffolk and South East Essex.

NB: In response to Peter Dean's comments, the following statement was issued by Essex County Council:

" Essex County Council is committed to making the Coroners' Service as efficient and focussed on the needs of bereaved citizens as possible.

In order to achieve this, the County Council is looking to work with its partners with the aim of achieving a more unified bereavement service, thereby ensuring that the needs of the bereaved can be met speedily with as little intrusion as possible.

There have been delays in progressing referrals from time to time but there are no current problems in this regard."."

0503Coroners20100406

Olivia O'leary is joined by two coroners, who discuss what their jobs involve.

This week on Between Ourselves Olivia O'leary is joined in conversation by two Coroners: Peter Dean and Christopher Dorries.

The job of the Coroner is commonly misunderstood; they don't conduct post-mortems or attend crime scenes, as Christopher Dorries says the average member of the public will see more dead bodies than I do".

Rather their role - if a death is sudden or unexplained - is to investigate the cause of death.

Together they discuss what their jobs entail.

On a personal level, how does continually dealing with death and bereavement affect them? What improvements can the recommendations they make during inquests have in wider society? And what problems do very high profile inquests raise? - One of Peter Dean's most public inquests was that of Myra Hindley, he recalls the special circumstances surrounding that.

On a wider scale, with the new Coroners and Justice Act coming into force, will there be greater pressure to hold inquests in secret? And will the appointment of a Chief Coroner for the first time lead to better funding and therefore a better and more consistent service offered to bereaved families? Peter Dean is damning in his criticism of one of the areas he represents (South East Essex) claiming that mismanagement has led to cancelled viewings of bodies and delayed funerals.

Join Olivia O'leary to get in the inside track on the unique role of the Coroner on Between Ourselves.

Christopher Dorries is the Coroner for South Yorkshire West.

Peter Dean is the Coroner for Suffolk and South East Essex.

NB: In response to Peter Dean's comments, the following statement was issued by Essex County Council:

" Essex County Council is committed to making the Coroners' Service as efficient and focussed on the needs of bereaved citizens as possible.

In order to achieve this, the County Council is looking to work with its partners with the aim of achieving a more unified bereavement service, thereby ensuring that the needs of the bereaved can be met speedily with as little intrusion as possible.

There have been delays in progressing referrals from time to time but there are no current problems in this regard."."

0504Gay Ministers20100413

Olivia O'leary talks to gay ministers Martin Reynolds and Clare Herbert.

Gay ministers, Martin Reynolds and Clare Herbert, talk to Olivia O'leary about whether the church accepts their sexuality and how open they can be about their personal life.

How do they reconcile the fact that if they win the acceptance they crave, it may split the church they love?

Producer: Sara Conkey.

0504Gay Ministers20100413

Olivia O'leary talks to gay ministers Martin Reynolds and Clare Herbert.

Gay ministers, Martin Reynolds and Clare Herbert, talk to Olivia O'leary about whether the church accepts their sexuality and how open they can be about their personal life.

How do they reconcile the fact that if they win the acceptance they crave, it may split the church they love?

Producer: Sara Conkey.

0505Child Psychologists20100420

Olivia O'leary talks to child psychologists Laverne Antrobus and Oliver James.

How to raise a happy, well-adjusted child is one of the biggest sources of angst for modern parents.

Child psychologists Laverne Antrobus and Oliver James discuss this challenge.

British society has a reputation for being intolerant towards children - they should be seen but ideally not heard.

And according to sections of the media, the reason that Britain is Broken is because unruly and badly brought up children are running wild, ignored by hopeless parents.

So what has gone so badly wrong with our approach towards children? How can it be improved? Should we send our children to day-care, or remain at home during their formative years? What kind of upbringing drives children to commit horrendous crimes, like the Bulger killers? On Between Ourselves today we are joined by two child psychologists who discuss all of this.

Laverne Antrobus has worked on TV programmes like 'The House of Tiny Tearaways', ITV's 'This Morning' and BBC Four's 'Who Needs Dads?', she's an author, and works as an educational psychologist at the Tavistock clinic in London.

Oliver James has written best-selling books including 'They F*** you Up' and 'Affluenza'.

He's also appeared on 'This Morning' putting into practice his theory of 'love-bombing' as a way of coping with challenging children.

0505Child Psychologists20100420

Olivia O'leary talks to child psychologists Laverne Antrobus and Oliver James.

How to raise a happy, well-adjusted child is one of the biggest sources of angst for modern parents.

Child psychologists Laverne Antrobus and Oliver James discuss this challenge.

British society has a reputation for being intolerant towards children - they should be seen but ideally not heard.

And according to sections of the media, the reason that Britain is Broken is because unruly and badly brought up children are running wild, ignored by hopeless parents.

So what has gone so badly wrong with our approach towards children? How can it be improved? Should we send our children to day-care, or remain at home during their formative years? What kind of upbringing drives children to commit horrendous crimes, like the Bulger killers? On Between Ourselves today we are joined by two child psychologists who discuss all of this.

Laverne Antrobus has worked on TV programmes like 'The House of Tiny Tearaways', ITV's 'This Morning' and BBC Four's 'Who Needs Dads?', she's an author, and works as an educational psychologist at the Tavistock clinic in London.

Oliver James has written best-selling books including 'They F*** you Up' and 'Affluenza'.

He's also appeared on 'This Morning' putting into practice his theory of 'love-bombing' as a way of coping with challenging children.

0506 LASTOpera Singers20100427

On Between Ourselves today Olivia O'leary meets two opera singers, Amanda Roocroft and Geoffrey Dolton.

Amanda was a prodigy who went straight from music school to national and international success but the pressure took its toll and she reached a crisis point where she had to reassess her entire career.

Geoffrey was also a success at music school whose subsequent career was on an upward trajectory.

But, dramatically, he entirely lost his voice and his career shattered.

Together they discuss the hugely demanding world of opera: the nerves, the backstage humour, the on-stage antics and the difficulties of being constantly on the road.

0506 LASTOpera Singers20100427

On Between Ourselves today Olivia O'leary meets two opera singers, Amanda Roocroft and Geoffrey Dolton.

Amanda was a prodigy who went straight from music school to national and international success but the pressure took its toll and she reached a crisis point where she had to reassess her entire career.

Geoffrey was also a success at music school whose subsequent career was on an upward trajectory.

But, dramatically, he entirely lost his voice and his career shattered.

Together they discuss the hugely demanding world of opera: the nerves, the backstage humour, the on-stage antics and the difficulties of being constantly on the road.

0601

0601

060120110405

A fascinating, and very personal, discussion between two people who have Asperger's Syndrome.

Presented by Olivia O'Leary.

Frederick Veal is in his late 40s, and was only diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome five years ago.

He said the diagnosis made sense of his entire life: of the difficulties, the strange habits, the problems holding down a job.

He gives a frank and fascinating description of his early life - an obsession with spinning, sensitivity to noise (he could hear humming coming from electric sockets), head-banging.

Since his diagnosis he has been able to learn certain coping techniques which make life more bearable.

Ben Delo found out he had Asperger's at the age of 11, when he bugged his parents' telephone calls.

This early diagnosis means he began the process of learning and copying many of the idiosyncratic, nonsensical, but necessary social habits that the rest of the world take for granted; things like shaking hands and making eye-contact.

Asperger's Syndrome is named after the Austrian psychologist who first described it, Dr Hans Asperger.

It's at the milder end of the autism spectrum and those with it have difficulty with social interaction, with reading social situations, with communicating.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

060120110405

A fascinating, and very personal, discussion between two people who have Asperger's Syndrome.

Presented by Olivia O'Leary.

Frederick Veal is in his late 40s, and was only diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome five years ago.

He said the diagnosis made sense of his entire life: of the difficulties, the strange habits, the problems holding down a job.

He gives a frank and fascinating description of his early life - an obsession with spinning, sensitivity to noise (he could hear humming coming from electric sockets), head-banging.

Since his diagnosis he has been able to learn certain coping techniques which make life more bearable.

Ben Delo found out he had Asperger's at the age of 11, when he bugged his parents' telephone calls.

This early diagnosis means he began the process of learning and copying many of the idiosyncratic, nonsensical, but necessary social habits that the rest of the world take for granted; things like shaking hands and making eye-contact.

Asperger's Syndrome is named after the Austrian psychologist who first described it, Dr Hans Asperger.

It's at the milder end of the autism spectrum and those with it have difficulty with social interaction, with reading social situations, with communicating.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

0602

0602

060220110412

The owners of two of Britain's finest stately homes in discussion with Olivia O'Leary.

Lady Carnarvon of Highclere Castle (the setting for Downton Abbey) and James Hervey Bathurst of Eastnor Castle discuss the responsibility of owning two of Britain's finest stately homes.

What's it like having everyone from Maggie Smith to Madonna, plus accompanying film crews, invade your family seat? Do you agree to place lit candles under oil paintings to keep the director happy?

Is it a necessary evil or a genuine pleasure to throw open your grounds and home to the general public? How else to make ends meet when the maintenance bills and heating costs for these old, cold, stone houses are so high?

Olivia O'Leary discusses how best to run your Stately Home on this week's Between Ourselves.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

060220110412

The owners of two of Britain's finest stately homes in discussion with Olivia O'Leary.

Lady Carnarvon of Highclere Castle (the setting for Downton Abbey) and James Hervey Bathurst of Eastnor Castle discuss the responsibility of owning two of Britain's finest stately homes.

What's it like having everyone from Maggie Smith to Madonna, plus accompanying film crews, invade your family seat? Do you agree to place lit candles under oil paintings to keep the director happy?

Is it a necessary evil or a genuine pleasure to throw open your grounds and home to the general public? How else to make ends meet when the maintenance bills and heating costs for these old, cold, stone houses are so high?

Olivia O'Leary discusses how best to run your Stately Home on this week's Between Ourselves.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

0603Multiple Births20110419

A mother of triplets and a mother of twins in discussion with Olivia O'Leary.

Multiple births -

Dawn Richards is the mother of naturally conceived triplets, Emily Carlisle had twins following IVF.

They join Olivia O'Leary in the Between Ourselves studio to discuss the joy and the sheer hard work of raising multiples.

Emily's delight at discovering she was having twins was followed by a series of unforeseen events which entirely changed her experience of motherhood.

Dawn describes the confusing moment she and her husband discovered they were having triplets.

Following a difficult pregnancy and an emergency birth, three tiny babies were brought home.

Through a haze of sleepless exhaustion Dawn changed 15 nappies, and prepared 15 bottles of milk a day.

When the first few months are over, the toddler years bring fresh challenges for parents of multiples:

If you're brave enough to risk a trip to the park, who do you decide to chase when one child runs to the duck-pond and the other towards the road?

And the most basic of needs - how does a mother of multiples go to the loo? According to Emily, with at least one small child sitting on your lap.

Or have a shower? With three small faces pressed up against the glass.

And would Emily or Dawn have more children? Join them on this week's edition of Between Ourselves to find out.

producer: Karen Gregor.

0603Multiple Births20110419

A mother of triplets and a mother of twins in discussion with Olivia O'Leary.

Multiple births -

Dawn Richards is the mother of naturally conceived triplets, Emily Carlisle had twins following IVF.

They join Olivia O'Leary in the Between Ourselves studio to discuss the joy and the sheer hard work of raising multiples.

Emily's delight at discovering she was having twins was followed by a series of unforeseen events which entirely changed her experience of motherhood.

Dawn describes the confusing moment she and her husband discovered they were having triplets.

Following a difficult pregnancy and an emergency birth, three tiny babies were brought home.

Through a haze of sleepless exhaustion Dawn changed 15 nappies, and prepared 15 bottles of milk a day.

When the first few months are over, the toddler years bring fresh challenges for parents of multiples:

If you're brave enough to risk a trip to the park, who do you decide to chase when one child runs to the duck-pond and the other towards the road?

And the most basic of needs - how does a mother of multiples go to the loo? According to Emily, with at least one small child sitting on your lap.

Or have a shower? With three small faces pressed up against the glass.

And would Emily or Dawn have more children? Join them on this week's edition of Between Ourselves to find out.

producer: Karen Gregor.

0604 LASTConcert Pianists20110426

James Rhodes and Susan Tomes, two concert pianists, discuss their work with Olivia O'Leary

James Rhodes and Susan Tomes, two concert pianists, discuss with work with Olivia O'Leary.

0604 LASTConcert Pianists20110426

James Rhodes and Susan Tomes, two concert pianists, discuss their work with Olivia O'Leary

James Rhodes and Susan Tomes, two concert pianists, discuss with work with Olivia O'Leary.

198C0119980813

Olivia O'Leary talks to pairs of people who have had parallel experiences.

Olivia O'Leary talks to eight pairs of people who have had parallel experiences.

Alexandra Little - sister of hostage Camilla Carr - and Jill Morrell compare notes on running a long campaign.

198C0119980813

Olivia O'Leary talks to pairs of people who have had parallel experiences.

Olivia O'Leary talks to eight pairs of people who have had parallel experiences.

Alexandra Little - sister of hostage Camilla Carr - and Jill Morrell compare notes on running a long campaign.

198C0219980820

Richard Olivier and Ken Wiwa discuss how they emerged from their fathers' shadows.

198C0219980820

Richard Olivier and Ken Wiwa discuss how they emerged from their fathers' shadows.

198C0319980827

Mary Kenny and Anna Coote talk about the changing face of feminism.

198C0319980827

Mary Kenny and Anna Coote talk about the changing face of feminism.

198C0419980903

Sir Peter Hall and Sir Richard Eyre compare notes on running the National Theatre.

198C0419980903

Sir Peter Hall and Sir Richard Eyre compare notes on running the National Theatre.

198C0519980910

Nan Wise and Elisabeth Sanders talk about their very different reactions to their husbands' infidelity.

198C0519980910

Nan Wise and Elisabeth Sanders talk about their very different reactions to their husbands' infidelity.

198C0619980917

Ian Hislop, editor of Private Eye, and Oliver Schmitt, editor of the German satirical magazine Titanic, explore the power of satire.

198C0619980917

Ian Hislop, editor of Private Eye, and Oliver Schmitt, editor of the German satirical magazine Titanic, explore the power of satire.

198C0719980924

Valerie Netties and Jane Druburgh compare notes on the unexplained disappearance of a family member.

198C0719980924

Valerie Netties and Jane Druburgh compare notes on the unexplained disappearance of a family member.

198C08 LAST19981001

Maria Bentley-Dingwall, niece of Derek Bentley, and Georgina Ellis, daughter of Ruth, discuss the legacy of the death penalty.

198C08 LAST19981001

Maria Bentley-Dingwall, niece of Derek Bentley, and Georgina Ellis, daughter of Ruth, discuss the legacy of the death penalty.

198C0919981008

Olivia O'Leary talks to pairs of people who have had parallel experiences.

198C0919981008

Olivia O'Leary talks to pairs of people who have had parallel experiences.

200B0120000425

Politicians Shirley Williams and Shaun Woodward both left their respective parties.

They discuss loyalty, integrity and the price of conscience.

200B0120000425

Politicians Shirley Williams and Shaun Woodward both left their respective parties.

They discuss loyalty, integrity and the price of conscience.

200B0220000502

This week she speaks to two gay fathers about their experiences of bringing up children.

200B0220000502

This week she speaks to two gay fathers about their experiences of bringing up children.

200B0320000509

This week she speaks to prisoners on death row in the UNITED STATES and asks how they face the devastating consequences of their friendship.

200B0320000509

This week she speaks to prisoners on death row in the UNITED STATES and asks how they face the devastating consequences of their friendship.

200B0420000516

Crime writers Ian Rankin and Sarah Dunant discuss the modern detective hero.

200B0420000516

Crime writers Ian Rankin and Sarah Dunant discuss the modern detective hero.

200B0520000523

Two bishops - one Anglican, one Catholic - discuss issues that divide them and issues on which they are united.

200B0520000523

Two bishops - one Anglican, one Catholic - discuss issues that divide them and issues on which they are united.

200B0620000530

She asks writers in exile, Vincent Magombe and George Szirtes, whether being an outsider is a help or hindrance to their work.

200B0620000530

She asks writers in exile, Vincent Magombe and George Szirtes, whether being an outsider is a help or hindrance to their work.

200B0720000606

This week she speaks to two women with eating disorders.

200B0720000606

This week she speaks to two women with eating disorders.

200B08 LAST20000613

This week, she speaks to Robert Fisk and Martin Bell MP about their lives as foreign correspondents.

They discuss war, morality and the problem of censorship.

200B08 LAST20000613

This week, she speaks to Robert Fisk and Martin Bell MP about their lives as foreign correspondents.

They discuss war, morality and the problem of censorship.

201B01Going Undercover20010424

She meets two people who have lived life undercover, and they talk about the stresses and strains of leading a double life.

201B01Going Undercover20010424

She meets two people who have lived life undercover, and they talk about the stresses and strains of leading a double life.

201B02The Biographer's Art20010501

Eminent biographers Michael Holroyd and Humphrey Carpenter join Olivia O'leary to discuss the passion and problems involved in writing about someone else's life.

201B02The Biographer's Art20010501

Eminent biographers Michael Holroyd and Humphrey Carpenter join Olivia O'leary to discuss the passion and problems involved in writing about someone else's life.

201B03Nuns20010508

What makes one decide to dedicate one's life totally to God? A postulant and a nun from contemplative enclosed orders talk about the emotions and sacrifices involved in living a life of chastity and obedience.

201B03Nuns20010508

What makes one decide to dedicate one's life totally to God? A postulant and a nun from contemplative enclosed orders talk about the emotions and sacrifices involved in living a life of chastity and obedience.

201B04Political Cartoonists20010515

Peter Brookes and Gerald Scarfe discuss their work as political cartoonists and how their images often say far more than words ever could.

201B04Political Cartoonists20010515

Peter Brookes and Gerald Scarfe discuss their work as political cartoonists and how their images often say far more than words ever could.

201B05Living With Genius20010522

Two parents discuss frankly their experiences of bringing up gifted children, the battles they have fought and the challenges they have yet to face.

201B05Living With Genius20010522

Two parents discuss frankly their experiences of bringing up gifted children, the battles they have fought and the challenges they have yet to face.

201B06Conductors20010529

Sakari Orama, of the CBSO, and Mark Elder, from the Halle Orchestra, talk in depth about the skills and techniques involved in taking over established orchestras.

201B06Conductors20010529

Sakari Orama, of the CBSO, and Mark Elder, from the Halle Orchestra, talk in depth about the skills and techniques involved in taking over established orchestras.

201B07Lone Twins20010605

Two `lone twins', brought up without their twins due to separation or death, discuss their personal stories of separation and self-discovery.

Two 'lone twins', brought up without their twins due to separation or death, discuss their personal stories of separation and self-discovery.

201B07Lone Twins20010605

Two `lone twins', brought up without their twins due to separation or death, discuss their personal stories of separation and self-discovery.

Two 'lone twins', brought up without their twins due to separation or death, discuss their personal stories of separation and self-discovery.

201B08 LASTLiving With A Name20010612

Gottfried Wagner and Nicholas Mosley talk openly about their experience of being related to someone who is internationally reviled.

201B08 LASTLiving With A Name20010612

Gottfried Wagner and Nicholas Mosley talk openly about their experience of being related to someone who is internationally reviled.

202C01Astronauts2002072120020726

Story Musgrave and Claudie Haignere talk about their space-travelling experiences, from the Cold War to the peaceful cooperation aboard the International Space Station.

202C01Astronauts2002072120020726

Story Musgrave and Claudie Haignere talk about their space-travelling experiences, from the Cold War to the peaceful cooperation aboard the International Space Station.

202C022002072820020802

Two women whose husbands have suffered severe and traumatising amnesia describe their experiences.

202C022002072820020802

Two women whose husbands have suffered severe and traumatising amnesia describe their experiences.

202C032002080420020809

Olivia O'leary talks to two women about their traumatic experience of forced marriage and being 'sold into slavery' by their own families.

202C032002080420020809

Olivia O'leary talks to two women about their traumatic experience of forced marriage and being 'sold into slavery' by their own families.

202C042002081120020816

Olivia O'leary talks to acclaimed photographers Horst Faas and Tom Stoddard about the changing face of international photojournalism.

202C042002081120020816

Olivia O'leary talks to acclaimed photographers Horst Faas and Tom Stoddard about the changing face of international photojournalism.

202C052002081820020823
202C052002081820020823
202C06Professional Gamblers2002082520020830

Olivia O'leary talks to two professional gamblers about their shady existence working the world's casinos.

202C06Professional Gamblers2002082520020830

Olivia O'leary talks to two professional gamblers about their shady existence working the world's casinos.

202C07Ocd2002090120020906

Olivia O'leary talks to two sufferers of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, who explain what it is like to live under the constant anxiety associated with this condition.

202C07Ocd2002090120020906

Olivia O'leary talks to two sufferers of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, who explain what it is like to live under the constant anxiety associated with this condition.

202C08 LASTChildren Of Criminal Figitives2002090820020913

Olivia O'leary talks to Nick Reynolds, son of train robber Bruce, and Amber Marks, daughter of drug smuggler Howard, about their lives as fugitives and how they see their fathers.

202C08 LASTChildren Of Criminal Figitives2002090820020913

Olivia O'leary talks to Nick Reynolds, son of train robber Bruce, and Amber Marks, daughter of drug smuggler Howard, about their lives as fugitives and how they see their fathers.

203C01Mercenaries20030729

Olivia O'Leary talks to two mercenaries, soldiers of fortune who made their living fighting brutal wars in Africa and South America.

203C01Mercenaries20030729

Olivia O'Leary talks to two mercenaries, soldiers of fortune who made their living fighting brutal wars in Africa and South America.

203C02Manic Depression20030805

Olivia O'Leary talks to two people whose lives have been disrupted by manic DEPRESSION.

203C02Manic Depression20030805

Olivia O'Leary talks to two people whose lives have been disrupted by manic DEPRESSION.

203C0320030812

Olivia O'Leary talks to Jacqueline Wilson and Keith Gray, who explain why they enjoy writing gritty and realistic fiction for children.

203C0320030812

Olivia O'Leary talks to Jacqueline Wilson and Keith Gray, who explain why they enjoy writing gritty and realistic fiction for children.

203C0420030819

Join Olivia O'Leary for this week's Between Ourselves as she hears the unique and disturbing stories of Gabriel Shumba and Carlos Reyes.

Gabriel Shumba is a 29 year old Zimbabwean lawyer.

Since he experienced brutality at the hands of his step-father, and by the cattle herdsmen he worked for when he was forced to leave school, he developed an interest in helping people maltreated by those in authority.

He eventually went on to become a human rights lawyer, and in January of this year was representing an opposition MP (from the Movement for Democratic Change), when he was abducted and tortured.

Carlos Reyes, now in his 50s, suffered similar treatment in Pinochet's Chile thirty years ago.

He could not bring himself to describe what he went through, fearful of breaking down, but, incredibly, urges Gabriel to find forgiveness for his torturers.

Carlos blames the political leaders and the system for his treatment, it is they who should be brought to justice.

In his eyes the men who carried out the torture were also victims of that system.

203C0420030819

Join Olivia O'Leary for this week's Between Ourselves as she hears the unique and disturbing stories of Gabriel Shumba and Carlos Reyes.

Gabriel Shumba is a 29 year old Zimbabwean lawyer.

Since he experienced brutality at the hands of his step-father, and by the cattle herdsmen he worked for when he was forced to leave school, he developed an interest in helping people maltreated by those in authority.

He eventually went on to become a human rights lawyer, and in January of this year was representing an opposition MP (from the Movement for Democratic Change), when he was abducted and tortured.

Carlos Reyes, now in his 50s, suffered similar treatment in Pinochet's Chile thirty years ago.

He could not bring himself to describe what he went through, fearful of breaking down, but, incredibly, urges Gabriel to find forgiveness for his torturers.

Carlos blames the political leaders and the system for his treatment, it is they who should be brought to justice.

In his eyes the men who carried out the torture were also victims of that system.

203C05Self-experimenting Doctors20030826

Olivia O'Leary meets two pioneering doctors who carried out groundbreaking experiments on themselves.

203C05Self-experimenting Doctors20030826

Olivia O'Leary meets two pioneering doctors who carried out groundbreaking experiments on themselves.

203C06Inter-country Adoption20030902

Una Mills decided to adopt a baby girl from a Chinese orphanage five years ago and as a result, Qin Ye from Nanjing became Ruth Mills from Wiltshire.

Ruth is a happy and settled little girl, but memories and experiences from her nine months in CHINA are deep within her.

Pat Wordley thought she couldn't have children, and desperately wanted to adopt a baby.

Just as she was arranging to fly to South America to bring home Amy, she discovered she was pregnant.

She went ahead with the adoption, and in the space of a year became the mother of Amy, and her natural son, both are now 17.

Olivia O'Leary meets Una Mills and Pat Wordley and hears about the practicalities, the huge emotional challenges, and the great rewards that adoption from abroad can bring.

203C06Inter-country Adoption20030902

Una Mills decided to adopt a baby girl from a Chinese orphanage five years ago and as a result, Qin Ye from Nanjing became Ruth Mills from Wiltshire.

Ruth is a happy and settled little girl, but memories and experiences from her nine months in CHINA are deep within her.

Pat Wordley thought she couldn't have children, and desperately wanted to adopt a baby.

Just as she was arranging to fly to South America to bring home Amy, she discovered she was pregnant.

She went ahead with the adoption, and in the space of a year became the mother of Amy, and her natural son, both are now 17.

Olivia O'Leary meets Una Mills and Pat Wordley and hears about the practicalities, the huge emotional challenges, and the great rewards that adoption from abroad can bring.

203C07Designers20030909
203C07Designers20030909
203C08 LASTMiscarriages Of Justice20030916

Two men who, between them, spent nearly 40 years in jail for crimes they did not commit tell their stories to Olivia O'Leary.

203C08 LASTMiscarriages Of Justice20030916

Two men who, between them, spent nearly 40 years in jail for crimes they did not commit tell their stories to Olivia O'Leary.

204C01Songwriters20040713

Olivia O'Leary meets Mitch Murray and Guy Chambers, songwriters for the stars.

204C01Songwriters20040713

Olivia O'Leary meets Mitch Murray and Guy Chambers, songwriters for the stars.

204C02Carers20040720

Olivia O'Leary meets Barbara Pointon and Ian Cash, two full-time carers.

204C02Carers20040720

Olivia O'Leary meets Barbara Pointon and Ian Cash, two full-time carers.

204C03Art Scams20040727

Olivia O'Leary meets forger John Myatt and convicted fraudster Tod Volpe to discuss corruption in the art world.

John Myatt was one of Britain's most prolific forgers creating fake paintings that fooled leading galleries.

Before ending up in jail for fraud Tod Volpe, a one time Hollywood art dealer, had a client list including Jack Nicholson and a host of movie producers.

204C03Art Scams20040727

Olivia O'Leary meets forger John Myatt and convicted fraudster Tod Volpe to discuss corruption in the art world.

John Myatt was one of Britain's most prolific forgers creating fake paintings that fooled leading galleries.

Before ending up in jail for fraud Tod Volpe, a one time Hollywood art dealer, had a client list including Jack Nicholson and a host of movie producers.

204C04Sexual Abuse20040803

How would you feel if you discovered your children had been sexually abused? Olivia O'Leary meets two women whose husbands abused their children.

204C04Sexual Abuse20040803

How would you feel if you discovered your children had been sexually abused? Olivia O'Leary meets two women whose husbands abused their children.

204C05Jockeys20040810

Olivia O'Leary meets two of the most successful jump jockeys of all time.

Peter Scudamore was champion jockey eight times and Mick Fitzgerald has won both the Grand National and the Cheltenham Gold Cup.

Mick tells of breaking his collar bones so many times he's had them removed.

204C05Jockeys20040810

Olivia O'Leary meets two of the most successful jump jockeys of all time.

Peter Scudamore was champion jockey eight times and Mick Fitzgerald has won both the Grand National and the Cheltenham Gold Cup.

Mick tells of breaking his collar bones so many times he's had them removed.

204C06Young Alcoholics20040817

Olivia O'Leary discusses the brutal effects of alcoholism with two recovering young alcoholics.

Del was just eighteen when he was diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver.

Angela considered prostitution to support herself and her drinking.

Today, in recovery, they discuss the dangers of alcohol abuse for young people today.

204C06Young Alcoholics20040817

Olivia O'Leary discusses the brutal effects of alcoholism with two recovering young alcoholics.

Del was just eighteen when he was diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver.

Angela considered prostitution to support herself and her drinking.

Today, in recovery, they discuss the dangers of alcohol abuse for young people today.

204C07Expat Politicians20040824

Olivia O'Leary meets Midlander Mike Bennett now a politician in Bolivia and German born Gisela Stuart, now a British MP and finds out if it really is possible for a foreigner to represent another country's people.

What do you bring of your own country to your adopted home? And the ultimate show of loyalty, which country would you die for?

204C07Expat Politicians20040824

Olivia O'Leary meets Midlander Mike Bennett now a politician in Bolivia and German born Gisela Stuart, now a British MP and finds out if it really is possible for a foreigner to represent another country's people.

What do you bring of your own country to your adopted home? And the ultimate show of loyalty, which country would you die for?

204C08 LASTSurvivors Of Disasters20040831

Olivia O'leary meets Ruth Millington who survived the Bam Earthquake and Mary Campion who survived the sinking of an ocean liner.

Ruth recalls waking up to find herself in the midst of the quake with tons of bricks bouncing around the room.

Later she helped to rescue people buried in the ruins.

Mary still has flashbacks from the Jupiter cruise line disaster which sank off the coast of Athens from which hundreds of school children were rescued.

204C08 LASTSurvivors Of Disasters20040831

Olivia O'leary meets Ruth Millington who survived the Bam Earthquake and Mary Campion who survived the sinking of an ocean liner.

Ruth recalls waking up to find herself in the midst of the quake with tons of bricks bouncing around the room.

Later she helped to rescue people buried in the ruins.

Mary still has flashbacks from the Jupiter cruise line disaster which sank off the coast of Athens from which hundreds of school children were rescued.

205C0120050816

The Observer's Lynn Barber and The Sunday Telegraph's Nigel Farndale reveal the secrets of interviewing and writing about celebrities.

205C0120050816

The Observer's Lynn Barber and The Sunday Telegraph's Nigel Farndale reveal the secrets of interviewing and writing about celebrities.

205C0220050823

What would your reaction be if your son told you he wanted to die and needed your support? Would you go along with it? What if your brother asked you to help him travel to Switzerland to end his life - would you help him? Olivia O'Leary meets two women who were faced with these choices.

Both men had degenerative illnesses and did not want to live any longer, and both women were faced with helping them to die.

But that is where the similarities end.

Lesley Close's brother joined Dignitas, and travelled with Lesley and other friends and family to Switzerland where he was prescribed a dose of barbiturates which killed him within 20 minutes.

Heather Pratton's son took her to his flat to cook dinner, and announced that he had some heroin and planned to die there and then.

He took the heroin and lay down to die, falling asleep next to his mother.

When she woke up five hours later, he was still breathing, but at the point of no return.

To ensure he didn't recover, she put a pillow over his face.

She now has a criminal conviction, and resents a system which, she feels, forced her son into taking his life in this way.

205C0220050823

What would your reaction be if your son told you he wanted to die and needed your support? Would you go along with it? What if your brother asked you to help him travel to Switzerland to end his life - would you help him? Olivia O'Leary meets two women who were faced with these choices.

Both men had degenerative illnesses and did not want to live any longer, and both women were faced with helping them to die.

But that is where the similarities end.

Lesley Close's brother joined Dignitas, and travelled with Lesley and other friends and family to Switzerland where he was prescribed a dose of barbiturates which killed him within 20 minutes.

Heather Pratton's son took her to his flat to cook dinner, and announced that he had some heroin and planned to die there and then.

He took the heroin and lay down to die, falling asleep next to his mother.

When she woke up five hours later, he was still breathing, but at the point of no return.

To ensure he didn't recover, she put a pillow over his face.

She now has a criminal conviction, and resents a system which, she feels, forced her son into taking his life in this way.

205C03Election Directors20050830

They describe it as the politicians' Olympic Games: everyone is desperate to win and only the strong survive.

Olivia O'leary finds out what it's like to be in the thick of a General Election campaign.

Michael Dobbs worked with Margaret Thatcher in the '70s and '80s, and Peter Hyman was one of Tony Blair's secret weapons in 1997 and 2001.

They tell Olivia, with uncommon candour, what its like to be part of this world.

205C03Election Directors20050830

They describe it as the politicians' Olympic Games: everyone is desperate to win and only the strong survive.

Olivia O'leary finds out what it's like to be in the thick of a General Election campaign.

Michael Dobbs worked with Margaret Thatcher in the '70s and '80s, and Peter Hyman was one of Tony Blair's secret weapons in 1997 and 2001.

They tell Olivia, with uncommon candour, what its like to be part of this world.

205C04Body Dysmorphic Disorder20050906

Olivia O'Leary meets two people who suffer from Body Dysmorphic Disorder, two very attractive individuals who remain certain that they are so ugly they are offensive to look at.

Mark was approached by a fashion designer in a bar, and asked to work as a catwalk model, which he did, until the focus on his appearance meant he had to stop.

Sue cashed in her endowment policy to fund thousands of pounds worth of cosmetic surgery only to feel worse afterwards.

Olivia O'Leary meets two people who suffer from Body Dysmorphic Disorder, two very attractive individuals who remain certain that they are so ugly they are offensive to look at.Mark was approached by a fashion designer in a bar, and asked to work as a catwalk model, which he did, until the focus on his appearance meant he had to stop.Sue cashed in her endowment policy to fund thousands of pounds worth of cosmetic surgery only to feel worse afterwards.

205C04Body Dysmorphic Disorder20050906

Olivia O'Leary meets two people who suffer from Body Dysmorphic Disorder, two very attractive individuals who remain certain that they are so ugly they are offensive to look at.

Mark was approached by a fashion designer in a bar, and asked to work as a catwalk model, which he did, until the focus on his appearance meant he had to stop.

Sue cashed in her endowment policy to fund thousands of pounds worth of cosmetic surgery only to feel worse afterwards.

Olivia O'Leary meets two people who suffer from Body Dysmorphic Disorder, two very attractive individuals who remain certain that they are so ugly they are offensive to look at.Mark was approached by a fashion designer in a bar, and asked to work as a catwalk model, which he did, until the focus on his appearance meant he had to stop.Sue cashed in her endowment policy to fund thousands of pounds worth of cosmetic surgery only to feel worse afterwards.

205C05Forensic Archaeology20050913

This week's guests both started their professional careers as conventional archaeologists.

Professor Margaret Cox and Professor John Hunter both worked on traditional excavations, existing in an academic world.

Then came the discovery, by Hunter, that the skills of an archaeologist could be successfully applied to crime scenes: bodies could be located, murder scenarios could be worked out, and mass graves in places like Bosnia excavated and analysed.

Professor Hunter has dedicated many years to working on individual murder cases, including searching for Keith Bennett, the moors murders victim.

Professor Cox set up an organisation which helps to excavate mass graves in places like Iraq and Bosnia.

Forensic archaeology was developed in Britain, and training courses run by Cox are helping other nations to establish their own skills base.

Iraqi scientists were trained in the Wiltshire countryside, examining mock-ups of mass graves.

Then came the discovery, by Hunter, that the skills of an archaeologist could be successfully applied to crime scenes: bodies could be located, murder scenarios could be worked out, and mass graves in places like Bosnia excavated and analysed.Professor Hunter has dedicated many years to working on individual murder cases, including searching for Keith Bennett, the moors murders victim.

205C05Forensic Archaeology20050913

This week's guests both started their professional careers as conventional archaeologists.

Professor Margaret Cox and Professor John Hunter both worked on traditional excavations, existing in an academic world.

Then came the discovery, by Hunter, that the skills of an archaeologist could be successfully applied to crime scenes: bodies could be located, murder scenarios could be worked out, and mass graves in places like Bosnia excavated and analysed.

Professor Hunter has dedicated many years to working on individual murder cases, including searching for Keith Bennett, the moors murders victim.

Professor Cox set up an organisation which helps to excavate mass graves in places like Iraq and Bosnia.

Forensic archaeology was developed in Britain, and training courses run by Cox are helping other nations to establish their own skills base.

Iraqi scientists were trained in the Wiltshire countryside, examining mock-ups of mass graves.

Then came the discovery, by Hunter, that the skills of an archaeologist could be successfully applied to crime scenes: bodies could be located, murder scenarios could be worked out, and mass graves in places like Bosnia excavated and analysed.Professor Hunter has dedicated many years to working on individual murder cases, including searching for Keith Bennett, the moors murders victim.

205C06Community Activists20050920

Olivia O'Leary meets two social dynamos.

Both lived in conditions which frustrated them and demoralised their neighbours, so they took matters into their own hands.

Cathy McCormack and Mohammed Amram launched campaigns at a local level, and both ended up on national and international stages fighting for the rights of both their immediate and their global neighbours.

205C06Community Activists20050920

Olivia O'Leary meets two social dynamos.

Both lived in conditions which frustrated them and demoralised their neighbours, so they took matters into their own hands.

Cathy McCormack and Mohammed Amram launched campaigns at a local level, and both ended up on national and international stages fighting for the rights of both their immediate and their global neighbours.

205C07Zoo Directors20050927

Olivia O'Leary hears about some unusual predicaments: What do you do when you've got a rhino with a rectal prolapse? You think it's safely anaesthetised, but suddenly you realise that it's having problems breathing and could die unless you administer an antidote.

You're in the back of a small van, and when it wakes up the rhino will be extremely bad tempered and you've nowhere to run.

And what about the lemur which makes a break for freedom and sleeps peacefully in a tree surrounded by the police, fire brigade, and RSPCA, all trying to rescue it.

Chris West, of London Zoo, knows all about problems like this and, along with Stuart Muir of Newquay Zoo, discusses both the amusing side of zoo life and the ethical dilemmas you have to confront when you're the director of a zoo.

205C07Zoo Directors20050927

Olivia O'Leary hears about some unusual predicaments: What do you do when you've got a rhino with a rectal prolapse? You think it's safely anaesthetised, but suddenly you realise that it's having problems breathing and could die unless you administer an antidote.

You're in the back of a small van, and when it wakes up the rhino will be extremely bad tempered and you've nowhere to run.

And what about the lemur which makes a break for freedom and sleeps peacefully in a tree surrounded by the police, fire brigade, and RSPCA, all trying to rescue it.

Chris West, of London Zoo, knows all about problems like this and, along with Stuart Muir of Newquay Zoo, discusses both the amusing side of zoo life and the ethical dilemmas you have to confront when you're the director of a zoo.

205C08 LAST20051004

Canon Andrew White and Alastair Crooke talk with Olivia O'Leary about negotiating hostage releases and the ends of sieges in the Middle East.

205C08 LAST20051004

Canon Andrew White and Alastair Crooke talk with Olivia O'Leary about negotiating hostage releases and the ends of sieges in the Middle East.

206C0120060718

Featuring two mothers, each probing the death of a son abroad.

206C0120060718

Featuring two mothers, each probing the death of a son abroad.

206C0220060725

Featuring Catholic priests who left the priesthood to get married.

206C0220060725

Featuring Catholic priests who left the priesthood to get married.

206C0320060801

They debate the reality of living with schizophrenia.

206C0320060801

They debate the reality of living with schizophrenia.

206C04Prison Governors20060808

The Governor of Holloway and the Governor of Bristol discuss the ins and outs of running a prison.

206C04Prison Governors20060808

The Governor of Holloway and the Governor of Bristol discuss the ins and outs of running a prison.

206C05Boxers20060815

Featuring boxers Johnny Nelson and Billy Schwer.

206C05Boxers20060815

Featuring boxers Johnny Nelson and Billy Schwer.

206C0620060822

Trevor Kavanagh and Elinor Goodman debate roles as political editors.

206C0620060822

Trevor Kavanagh and Elinor Goodman debate roles as political editors.

206C0720060829

Supermodels Erin O'Connor and Carmen dell'Orefice share their experiences of the fashion industry.

206C0720060829

Supermodels Erin O'Connor and Carmen dell'Orefice share their experiences of the fashion industry.

206C08 LAST20060905

She talks to bomb disposal and mine clearance workers.

206C08 LAST20060905

She talks to bomb disposal and mine clearance workers.

207B0120070515

Olivia talks to two young people, one male and one female, to discuss what it means to sell the body for sex.

207B0120070515

Olivia talks to two young people, one male and one female, to discuss what it means to sell the body for sex.

207B0220070522

Two extras talk about their experiences as the lowest life-form on the film set.

207B0220070522

Two extras talk about their experiences as the lowest life-form on the film set.

207B0320070529

Police officers who have been the victims of violent attacks talk about the traumatising after-effects.

207B0320070529

Police officers who have been the victims of violent attacks talk about the traumatising after-effects.

207B0420070605

Two bankrupts discuss what can be regarded as either the worst financial disaster imaginable or a good way to clear debts and start again.

207B0420070605

Two bankrupts discuss what can be regarded as either the worst financial disaster imaginable or a good way to clear debts and start again.

207B0520070612

Investigative reporters Donal MacIntyre and Aniruddha Bahal discuss the physical danger, the morality and the motivation of going undercover to obtain a story.

207B0520070612

Investigative reporters Donal MacIntyre and Aniruddha Bahal discuss the physical danger, the morality and the motivation of going undercover to obtain a story.