Best Behaviour [discussion]

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
011991091819911215

Is it polite to breastfeed in public? Should men open doors for women? And is it the done thing to take a call from your mobile phone while entertaining clients? In the first of six programmes, Nigel Rees discusses such late

20th-century dilemmas and asks whether manners have changed.

Producer Sallie Davies (Rpt;

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

Is it polite to breastfeed in public? Should men open doors for women? In six programmes, Nigel Rees discusses such late

20th-century dilemmas and asks whether manners have changed. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

011991091819911215

Is it polite to breastfeed in public? Should men open doors for women? And is it the done thing to take a call from your mobile phone while entertaining clients? In the first of six programmes, Nigel Rees discusses such late

20th-century dilemmas and asks whether manners have changed.

Producer Sallie Davies (Rpt;

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

Is it polite to breastfeed in public? Should men open doors for women? In six programmes, Nigel Rees discusses such late

20th-century dilemmas and asks whether manners have changed. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

021991092519911222

In the second of six programmes, Nigel Rees discovers what kind of bad behaviour is annoying, ponders the art of saying "thank you" and looks at driving, kissing and swearing.

Everyday Manners

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

Six programmes.

2: Everyday Manners Nigel Rees discovers what kind of bad behaviour annoys us, ponders the art of saying 'thank you' and looks at driving, kissing and swearing. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

021991092519911222

In the second of six programmes, Nigel Rees discovers what kind of bad behaviour is annoying, ponders the art of saying "thank you" and looks at driving, kissing and swearing.

Everyday Manners

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

Six programmes.

2: Everyday Manners Nigel Rees discovers what kind of bad behaviour annoys us, ponders the art of saying 'thank you' and looks at driving, kissing and swearing. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

031991100219911229

Manners between the Sexes

Many men open doors for women - but how many would give up their seat for a woman or stand up when she enters the room? In the third of six programmes, Nigel Rees wonders if modern man is confused.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

Six programmes.

3: Manners Between the Sexes Many men open doors for women - but how many would give up their seat for a woman orstandup when she enters the room? Nigel Rees wonders if modern man is confused. Producer SallieDavies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

031991100219911229

Manners between the Sexes

Many men open doors for women - but how many would give up their seat for a woman or stand up when she enters the room? In the third of six programmes, Nigel Rees wonders if modern man is confused.

Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

Six programmes.

3: Manners Between the Sexes Many men open doors for women - but how many would give up their seat for a woman orstandup when she enters the room? Nigel Rees wonders if modern man is confused. Producer SallieDavies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

041991100919920105

Business Manners

More and more shop assistants are now trained to be courteous at work.

In the fourth of six programmes, Nigel Rees asks: do customers like the results? And are business manners more likely to improve during recession? Producer Sallie Davies

Stereo

Six programmes.

4: Business Manners More shop assistants are now trained to be courteous. But, asks Nigel Rees , do customers like the results? Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

041991100919920105

Business Manners

More and more shop assistants are now trained to be courteous at work.

In the fourth of six programmes, Nigel Rees asks: do customers like the results? And are business manners more likely to improve during recession? Producer Sallie Davies

Stereo

Six programmes.

4: Business Manners More shop assistants are now trained to be courteous. But, asks Nigel Rees , do customers like the results? Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

051991101619920112

Table Manners

In the fifth of six programmes, Nigel Rees discusses whether some table manners are necessary or just devices to frighten the uninitiated. Producer Sallie Davies. Stereo

Six programmes. 5: Table Manners Why are elbows on the table considered bad manners? And what is the correct way to eat peas? Nigel Rees asks whether some table manners are necessary or just devices to frighten the uninitiated. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

051991101619920112

Table Manners

In the fifth of six programmes, Nigel Rees discusses whether some table manners are necessary or just devices to frighten the uninitiated. Producer Sallie Davies. Stereo

Six programmes. 5: Table Manners Why are elbows on the table considered bad manners? And what is the correct way to eat peas? Nigel Rees asks whether some table manners are necessary or just devices to frighten the uninitiated. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

06 LAST1991102319920119

Nigel Rees concludes his series on modern manners by asking whether the British are too polite for their own good.

Producer Sallie Davies. Stereo

Last in the series. Nigel Rees asks whether the British are too polite for their own good and whether the "have a nice day" tendency is a welcome development. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies

06 LAST1991102319920119

Nigel Rees concludes his series on modern manners by asking whether the British are too polite for their own good.

Producer Sallie Davies. Stereo

Last in the series. Nigel Rees asks whether the British are too polite for their own good and whether the "have a nice day" tendency is a welcome development. Producer Sallie Davies

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Rees

Producer: Sallie Davies