Bats Out Of Hell - Meat Loaf

In 1977, as punk ravaged the world, a very different type of musical phenomenon was conceived in America. Its improbable perpetrators were an overweight former parking lot attendant from Dallas, and a New York-born writer of musicals who had just worked on a futuristic version of Peter Pan.

Marvin Lee Aday renamed himself Meat Loaf, and his collaborator Jim Steinman, poured his songs into a new project that would be roundly rejected and bounced from one record company to another. But that project was to become one of the bestselling albums in history, trashing the supposed new wave minimalist ideals of the day with its deliberately over-the-top rock operatics. The album also launched Meat Loaf on a rollercoaster career as a rock figurehead, and Steinman as a massively successful songwriter.

In Bats Out Of Hell, Paul Sexton tells the story of how the bat first flew, how it came to produce a hugely successful sequel fully 15 years later, and how it's ultimately led to Bat Out Of Hell III, unleashed by Meat Loaf this month. It's a story of hits, writs, tantrums and tortured souls, and it's told with the help of Meat Loaf, Steinman, producers Todd Rundgren and Desmond Child and other contributors to these epic recordings.

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20061007

In 1977, as punk ravaged the world, a very different type of musical phenomenon was conceived in America. Its improbable perpetrators were an overweight former parking lot attendant from Dallas, and a New York-born writer of musicals who had just worked on a futuristic version of Peter Pan.

Marvin Lee Aday renamed himself Meat Loaf, and his collaborator Jim Steinman, poured his songs into a new project that would be roundly rejected and bounced from one record company to another. But that project was to become one of the bestselling albums in history, trashing the supposed new wave minimalist ideals of the day with its deliberately over-the-top rock operatics. The album also launched Meat Loaf on a rollercoaster career as a rock figurehead, and Steinman as a massively successful songwriter.

In Bats Out Of Hell, Paul Sexton tells the story of how the bat first flew, how it came to produce a hugely successful sequel fully 15 years later, and how it's ultimately led to Bat Out Of Hell III, unleashed by Meat Loaf this month. It's a story of hits, writs, tantrums and tortured souls, and it's told with the help of Meat Loaf, Steinman, producers Todd Rundgren and Desmond Child and other contributors to these epic recordings.

20061007

In 1977, as punk ravaged the world, a very different type of musical phenomenon was conceived in America. Its improbable perpetrators were an overweight former parking lot attendant from Dallas, and a New York-born writer of musicals who had just worked on a futuristic version of Peter Pan.

Marvin Lee Aday renamed himself Meat Loaf, and his collaborator Jim Steinman, poured his songs into a new project that would be roundly rejected and bounced from one record company to another. But that project was to become one of the bestselling albums in history, trashing the supposed new wave minimalist ideals of the day with its deliberately over-the-top rock operatics. The album also launched Meat Loaf on a rollercoaster career as a rock figurehead, and Steinman as a massively successful songwriter.

In Bats Out Of Hell, Paul Sexton tells the story of how the bat first flew, how it came to produce a hugely successful sequel fully 15 years later, and how it's ultimately led to Bat Out Of Hell III, unleashed by Meat Loaf this month. It's a story of hits, writs, tantrums and tortured souls, and it's told with the help of Meat Loaf, Steinman, producers Todd Rundgren and Desmond Child and other contributors to these epic recordings.