Autobiography Of Mark Twain

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0120101108

Read by Kerry Shale.

After dozens of false starts Mark Twain embarked on his "Final (and Right) Plan" for telling the story of his life.

His innovative notion to "Talk only about the thing which interests you for the moment" meant that his thoughts could range freely.

The strict instruction that these texts remain unpublished for 100 years meant that when they came out, he would be "dead, and unaware, and indifferent" and therefore free to speak his "whole frank mind".

In celebration of the centenary of his death, the University of California Press have released his uncensored autobiography for the first time, exactly as he left it.

The author's authentic and unsuppressed voice speaks clearly from the grave as he intended, brimming with humour, ideas and opinions.

Abridged by Jane Marshall Productions

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

Kerry Shale reads from Mark Twain's autobiography.

0220101109

Read by Kerry Shale.

Mark Twain remembers the annual boyhood visits to his Uncle's farm in Florida.

He admits transporting the farm to several other locations in his later work, and his memories of his time there and the characters he met are every bit as vibrant in his newly published autobiography as the writing in the classic stories he based on them.

Abridged by Jane Marshall Productions

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

0320101110

Read by Kerry Shale.

In Nevada in 1864 there was a sudden fashion for duelling.

At the time Samuel L.

Clemens, better known now as Mark Twain, was City Editor on the Virginia City Enterprise.

He was just 29 years-old and though ambitious, he claims he had no desire to fight a duel, even for the honour of his paper.

But somehow, in spite of his intentions, he managed to provoke the proprietor of the rival Virginia Union.

Abridged by Jane Marshall Productions

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

Mark Twain recounts the fashion for duelling in 1870s Nevada.

0420101111

Read by Kerry Shale.The Morris Incident was a cause celebre which blasted apparently far bigger stories off the front pages of the American Press.

For Mark Twain, the fascination of the incident lies in what it tells you about the character of President Roosevelt.

Abridged by Jane Marshall Productions

Producer: Jane Marshall

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

Mark Twain reflects on a cause celebre and what it reveals about President Roosevelt.

Read by Kerry Shale.

The Morris Incident was a cause celebre which blasted apparently far bigger stories off the front pages of the American Press.

For Mark Twain, the fascination of the incident lies in what it tells you about the character of the President, Franklin D Roosevelt.

Mark Twain explains the significance of The Morris Incident.

05 LAST20101112

Read by Kerry Shale.

Mark Twain maintained that the proper material for an autobiography was to talk about the things that interest you for the moment, as your views on this or that would give an insight into your character.

He also decreed that his autobiography should not be published until he'd been dead for 100 years so that he could feel free to speak his "whole frank mind." And his outspoken views on the Moro incident, and the conduct of the American forces in the Philippines, certainly show a very different side to the man who is famous for his childhood classics.

Abridged by Jane Marshall Productions

Producer: Jane Marshall

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

Mark Twain gives his views on the behaviour of American forces in the Philippines.