Aunts Aren't Gentlemen

Episodes

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01A Typical Man About Town20131216

Blake Ritson reads a classic Jeeves and Wooster story from P G Wodehouse, one of the masters of comic fiction.

'Mr Wooster,' he said, 'you are a typical young man about town.'

'Oh thanks,' I responded, for it sounded like a compliment, and one always likes to say the civil thing.

Bertie Wooster has been overdoing the metropolitan life a little, so on doctor's orders, finds himself retiring to the quiet hamlet of Maiden Eggesford to 'sleep the sleep of the just and lead the quiet Martini-less life'. Only the presence of his irrepressible Aunt Dahlia shatters the rustic peace as an imbroglio develops - destined to be famous down the long years as the 'Maiden Eggesford Horror' or 'The Case Of The Cat Which Kept Popping Up When Least Expected' â€" which involves a stolen cat, an over-sensitive racehorse, and some star-crossed lovers. Wooster's quick-thinking butler Jeeves, as always, comes to the rescue.

In the first episode: 'A typical man about town' - on discovering some alarming spots, Bertie Wooster heads off to his quack, but on the way bumps into a former fiancÃ(c)e turned firebrand, her jealous paramour, and a very unwelcome adversary from the past.

The author of almost a hundred books and the creator of Jeeves, Blandings Castle, Psmith, Ukridge, Uncle Fred and Mr Mulliner, P G Wodehouse was born in 1881 in Guildford, Surrey, in 1881. He was created a Knight of the British Empire in 1975 and died on St. Valentine's Day in the same year at the age of ninety-three. Jeeves and Wooster were perhaps his best-known creations; 'Aunts Aren't Gentlemen' was published in 1974, and was the last novel to feature the literary duo.

Reader: Blake Ritson is an acclaimed stage an screen actor, who first gained recognition for his role in Tom Stoppards 'Arcadia', and more recently for his TV roles in 'Emma', 'Upstairs Downstairs' and 'Mansfield Park'.

Abridger: Richard Hamilton

Producer: Justine Willett.

02The Quiet, Martini-less Life20131217

Blake Ritson reads a classic Jeeves and Wooster story from P G Wodehouse, one of the masters of comic fiction.

'Mr Wooster,' he said, 'you are a typical young man about town.'

'Oh thanks,' I responded, for it sounded like a compliment, and one always likes to say the civil thing.

Bertie Wooster has been overdoing the metropolitan life a little, so on doctor's orders, finds himself retiring to the quiet hamlet of Maiden Eggesford to 'sleep the sleep of the just and lead the quiet Martini-less life'. Only the presence of his irrepressible Aunt Dahlia shatters the rustic peace as an imbroglio develops - destined to be famous down the long years as the 'Maiden Eggesford Horror' or 'The Case Of The Cat Which Kept Popping Up When Least Expected' - which involves a stolen cat, an over-sensitive racehorse, and some star-crossed lovers. Wooster's quick-thinking butler Jeeves, as always, comes to the rescue.

Today: 'The quiet, Martini-less life' - man-about-town Wooster finds himself, on doctor's orders, sampling the quiet life in the sleepy village of Maiden Eggesford. But then, best laid plans -

The author of almost a hundred books and the creator of Jeeves, Blandings Castle, Psmith, Ukridge, Uncle Fred and Mr Mulliner, P G Wodehouse was born in 1881 in Guildford, Surrey, in 1881. He was created a Knight of the British Empire in 1975 and died the same year at the age of ninety-three. Jeeves and Wooster were perhaps his best-known creations; 'Aunts Aren't Gentlemen' was published in 1974, and was the last novel to feature the literary duo.

Reader: Blake Ritson

Abridger: Richard Hamilton

Producer: Justine Willett.

03Has He Brought It Yet?20131218

A classic Jeeves and Wooster story from P G Wodehouse, one of the masters of comic fiction.

'Mr Wooster,' he said, 'you are a typical young man about town.'

'Oh thanks,' I responded, for it sounded like a compliment, and one always likes to say the civil thing.

Bertie Wooster has been overdoing the metropolitan life a little, so on doctor's orders, finds himself retiring to the quiet hamlet of Maiden Eggesford to 'sleep the sleep of the just and lead the quiet Martini-less life'. Only the presence of his irrepressible Aunt Dahlia shatters the rustic peace as an imbroglio develops - destined to be famous down the long years as the 'Maiden Eggesford Horror' or 'The Case Of The Cat Which Kept Popping Up When Least Expected' - which involves a stolen cat, an over-sensitive racehorse, and some star-crossed lovers. Wooster's quick-thinking butler Jeeves, as always, comes to the rescue.

Today: 'Has he brought it yet?' - the tribulations of the star-crossed lovers and a disappearing cat are tempting Bertie away from the quiet, Martini-less life.

The author of almost a hundred books and the creator of Jeeves, Blandings Castle, Psmith, Ukridge, Uncle Fred and Mr Mulliner, P G Wodehouse was born in 1881 in Guildford, Surrey, in 1881. He was created a Knight of the British Empire in 1975 and died the same year at the age of ninety-three. Jeeves and Wooster were perhaps his best-known creations; 'Aunts Aren't Gentlemen' was published in 1974, and was the last novel to feature the literary duo.

Reader: Blake Ritson

Abridger: Richard Hamilton

Producer: Justine Willett

04I Can Explain Everything20131219

Blake Ritson reads a classic Jeeves and Wooster story from P G Wodehouse, one of the masters of comic fiction.

'Mr Wooster,' he said, 'you are a typical young man about town.'

'Oh thanks,' I responded, for it sounded like a compliment, and one always likes to say the civil thing.

Bertie Wooster has been overdoing the metropolitan life a tad, so on doctor's orders, finds himself retiring to the quiet hamlet of Maiden Eggesford to 'sleep the sleep of the just and lead the quiet Martini-less life'. Only the presence of his irrepressible Aunt Dahlia shatters the rustic peace as an imbroglio develops, involving a stolen cat, an over-sensitive racehorse, and some star-crossed lovers. Wooster's quick-thinking butler Jeeves, as always, comes to the rescue.

Today: 'I can explain everything' - Bertie finds himself unexpectedly betrothed, and in receipt of a missing cat.

The author of almost a hundred books and the creator of Jeeves, Blandings Castle, Psmith, Ukridge, Uncle Fred and Mr Mulliner, P G Wodehouse was born in 1881 in Guildford, Surrey, in 1881. He was created a Knight of the British Empire in 1975 and died the same year at the age of ninety-three. Jeeves and Wooster were perhaps his best-known creations; 'Aunts Aren't Gentlemen' was published in 1974, and was the last novel to feature the literary duo.

Reader: Blake Ritson

Abridger: Richard Hamilton

Producer: Justine Willett.

05 LASTTrying To Brazen It Out20131220

A classic Jeeves and Wooster story from P G Wodehouse, one of the masters of comic fiction, read by Blake Ritson.

'Mr Wooster,' he said, 'you are a typical young man about town.'

'Oh thanks,' I responded, for it sounded like a compliment, and one always likes to say the civil thing.

Bertie Wooster has been rather overdoing the metropolitan life, so on doctor's orders, finds himself retiring to the quiet hamlet of Maiden Eggesford to 'sleep the sleep of the just and lead the quiet Martini-less life'. Only the presence of his irrepressible Aunt Dahlia shatters the rustic peace as an imbroglio develops, involving a stolen cat, an over-sensitive racehorse, and some star-crossed lovers. Wooster's quick-thinking butler Jeeves, as always, comes to the rescue.

Today: 'Trying to brazen it out' - Bertie is still trying to extricate himself from a very unwelcome betrothal, while avoiding the terrifying Pop Cook. Must he rely again on his quick-thinking butler, Jeeves?

The author of almost a hundred books and the creator of Jeeves, Blandings Castle, Psmith, Ukridge, Uncle Fred and Mr Mulliner, P G Wodehouse was born in 1881 in Guildford, Surrey, in 1881. He was created a Knight of the British Empire in 1975 and died the same year at the age of ninety-three. Jeeves and Wooster were perhaps his best-known creations; 'Aunts Aren't Gentlemen' was published in 1974, and was the last novel to feature the literary duo.

Reader: Blake Ritson

Abridger: Richard Hamilton

Producer: Justine Willett