Anton Bruckner (1824-1896)

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
012007070220080804

Donald Macleod explores Bruckner's time in Vienna, during which the composer produced his greatest and most enduring works. However, although his symphonies exude power, confidence and surety of purpose, Bruckner himself was neurotic, obsessive and wracked by self-doubt.

Pange lingua for 4 part choir

Choir of St Bride's Church

Robert Jones (conductor)

Mass No 3 in F minor (excerpts)

Maria Stader (soprano)

Claudia Hellmann (alto)

Ernst Hafliger (tenor)

Kim Borg (bass)

Anton Nowakowski (organ)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

Eugen Jochum (conductor)

Symphony No 4 in E flat (Romantic: 1st mvt)

Vienna Philharmonic

Karl Bohm (conductor).

012013012820150713 (R3)

Donald Macleod traces Bruckner's extended musical apprenticeship.

Although Bruckner is now celebrated as one of the greatest symphonists of the 19th century, he took an unusually long time to achieve his musical ambitions. Donald Macleod traces Bruckner's extended musical apprenticeship from his father's organ bench in the village church to the creation of his first symphony nearly forty years later.

Bruckner: Symphony No.4 in E flat (Romantic) - III. Scherzo

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Karl Böhm

Bruckner: Missa Solemnis in B flat minor - Kyrie and Gloria

Christiane Oelze (soprano), Claudia Schubert (alto), Jörg Dürmüller (tenor), Reinhardt Hagen (bass), Bamberg Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, conducted by Karl Anton Rickenbacher

Bruckner: Ave Maria; Pange lingua

The Netherlands Chamber Choir, conducted by Uwe Gronostay

Bruckner: Symphony No.1 in C minor - II Adagio and III Scherzo

Saarbrücken Radio Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Stanislaw Skrowaczewski.

022007070320080805

Donald Macleod continues his exploration of Bruckner's Vienna years, at a time when the musical life of the city was sharply divided. You were either a Brahmsian or a Wagnerian, and the two camps were as implacably opposed as mods and rockers.

Abendzauber, for baritone solo, men's chorus, distant voices and 4 horns

Markus Krause (baritone)

Suddeutsches Vokalensemble

Hornensemble Marie Luise Neunecker

Rolf Beck (conductor)

Os Justi, Gradual for 8 part choir

Monteverdi Choir

John Eliot Gardiner (conductor)

String Quintet in F (4th mvt)

Ronald Hoogeveen, Rami Koch (violins)

Zoltan Benyacs, Prunella Pacey (violas)

Henk Lambooij (cello)

Symphony No 5 in B (1st mvt)

Berlin Philharmonic

Gunter Wand (conductor)

022013012920150714 (R3)

Donald Macleod on how overwork and frustration were leading Bruckner towards a breakdown.

Overwork and frustration were fast making life in the city of Linz intolerable for Bruckner. Even so, the hesitant composer had to be coaxed and cajoled into taking the next big leap in his career that would take him to Vienna, one of the great musical centres of the world. Presented by Donald Macleod.

Bruckner: Mass No.2 in E minor - Kyrie

Gächinger Kantorei Stuttgart, Bach-Collegium Stuttgart, conducted by Helmuth Rilling

Bruckner: Symphony No.8 in C minor - II Scherzo

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Daniel Barenboim

Bruckner: Christus factus est

La Chapelle Royale and Collegium Vocale, directed by Philippe Herreweghe

Bruckner: Symphony No.3 in D minor - I. Mehr langsam, Misterioso

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Eugen Jochum.

032007070420080806

Donald Macleod introduces Bruckner's Te Deum, which the composer is said to have regarded as his greatest work, and the 7th Symphony, whose Adagio was Bruckner's monument to the man he always referred to as 'the Master', Richard Wagner.

Christus factus est, Gradual for 4 part choir.

Monteverdi Choir

John Eliot Gardiner (conductor)

Te Deum (excerpts)

Jessye Norman (soprano)

Yvonne Minton (mezzo-soprano)

David Rendall (tenor)

Samuel Ramey (bass)

Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

Daniel Barenboim (conductor)

Symphony No 7 in E (2nd mvt)

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

Herbert Von Karajan (conductor).

032013013020150715 (R3)

Bruckner's radical approach to the symphony was not going down well in his home of Vienna.

Bruckner's radical and visionary approach to writing symphonies was not going down well in his home of Vienna. The deeply conservative audience found his music baffling and the critics were caustic. Bruckner took refuge at the monastery of St. Florian and the organ he'd played as a child. Presented by Donald Macleod.

042007070520080807

Donald Macleod introduces Bruckner's epic Eighth Symphony and describes the spate of 'revision mania' that followed in its wake.

Virga Jesse, Alleluia-verse for 4 part choir; Ecce sacerdos magnus, Gradual for 8 part choir, 3 trombones and organ

Chorus of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

Eugen Jochum (conductor)

Symphony No 8 in C minor (2nd and 3rd mvts)

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

Pierre Boulez (conductor).

Donald Macleod introduces Bruckner's epic 8th Symphony and describes the spate of 'revision mania' that followed in its wake.

042013013120150716 (R3)

Exploring why Bruckner's elation from the success of his Seventh Symphony was short-lived.

Bruckner's elation following the success of his seventh symphony was short lived. His next symphony was rejected as bewildering by his conductor friend and 'artistic father', Hermann Levi, dealing a blow to the composer's confidence that had devastating consequences. Presented by Donald Macleod.

Bruckner: Virga Jesse floruit

Netherlands Chamber Choir, conducted by Uwe Gronostay

Bruckner: Symphony No.8 in C minor - IV Finale

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Herbert von Karajan

Bruckner: Te Deum

Karita Mattila (soprano), Susanne Mentzer (mezzo-soprano), Vinson Cole (tenor), Robert Holl (bass), Bavarian Radio Choir, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Bernard Haitink.

052013020120150717 (R3)

How biographers have struggled to reconcile Bruckner the man with the spirit of his music.

Donald Macleod looks at how biographers have struggled to reconcile what we know of Bruckner the man with the spirit of his music, and the perplexing task of unpicking his ultimate musical intentions from the multiple versions and editions of his symphonies he left behind.

Bruckner: Psalm 150

Pamela Coburn (soprano), Gächinger Kantorei Stuttgart, Bach-Collegium Stuttgart, conducted by Helmuth Rilling

Bruckner: Symphony No.9 in D minor - I Feierlich Misterioso

Saarbrücken Radio Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Stanislaw Skrowaczewski

Bruckner (arr. Erwin Horn): Symphony No.6 in A - II Adagio

Erwin Horn (organ).

05 LAST2007070620080808

Donald Macleod concludes his look at Bruckner's Vienna years. The programme includes his astonishing Symphony No 9, on which Bruckner laboured, but failed to finish before his death.

Psalm 150, for soprano, chorus and orchestra

Ruth Welting (soprano)

Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

Daniel Barenboim (conductor)

Vexilla regis, Hymn for 4 part choir

Chorus of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

Eugen Jochum (conductor)

Helgoland, symphonic chorus for male voices and orchestra

Male voices of the Berlin Radio Choir

Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

Symphony No 9 in D minor (1st mvt)

New Philharmonic Orchestra of Westphalia

Johannes Wildner (conductor).

05 LAST20130201

How biographers have struggled to reconcile Bruckner the man with the spirit of his music.

Donald Macleod looks at how biographers have struggled to reconcile what we know of Bruckner the man with the spirit of his music, and the perplexing task of unpicking his ultimate musical intentions from the multiple versions and editions of his symphonies he left behind.