Ancient Light

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0120120716

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs

0120120716

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

0220120717

In today's episode of Ancient Light, by John Banville, Alexander Cleave remembers his 'first encounter' with his best friend's mother, Mrs Gray, 'on a watercolour April day of gusts and sudden rain and vast, rinsed skies.'

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs

0220120717

In today's episode of Ancient Light, by John Banville, Alexander Cleave remembers his 'first encounter' with his best friend's mother, Mrs Gray, 'on a watercolour April day of gusts and sudden rain and vast, rinsed skies.'

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

0320120718

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, actor Alexander Cleave recalls both the joys and the damp of the secret place of rendezvous that Mrs Gray and he made their own, that long lost summer.

And the new script arrives.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs

0320120718

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, actor Alexander Cleave recalls both the joys and the damp of the secret place of rendezvous that Mrs Gray and he made their own, that long lost summer.

And the new script arrives.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

0420120719

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, Alexander Cleave enters the strange new world of film and discovers that the man he is to play is shrouded in mystery. Memories of Mrs Gray continue to haunt him.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs

0420120719

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, Alexander Cleave enters the strange new world of film and discovers that the man he is to play is shrouded in mystery. Memories of Mrs Gray continue to haunt him.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

0520120720

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, Alexander Cleave remembers the risks Mrs Gray and he took in that intoxicating summer, and learns that his co-star, the glamorous Dawn Devonport, has also suffered a bereavement.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs

0520120720

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, Alexander Cleave remembers the risks Mrs Gray and he took in that intoxicating summer, and learns that his co-star, the glamorous Dawn Devonport, has also suffered a bereavement.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

0620120723

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, Dermot Crowley continues to reveal an ageing actor's memories - of his lost daughter Cass, and his lost first love, Mrs Gray. If he cannot bring Cass back, can Alex trace Mrs Gray?

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

If he cannot bring his lost daughter Cass back, can Alexander trace first love Mrs Gray?

0620120723

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, Dermot Crowley continues to reveal an ageing actor's memories - of his lost daughter Cass, and his lost first love, Mrs Gray. If he cannot bring Cass back, can Alex trace Mrs Gray?

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

If he cannot bring his lost daughter Cass back, can Alexander trace first love Mrs Gray?

0720120724

In today's episode, Alex Cleave returns to Italy, to the coast where his beloved Cass died so mysteriously, and takes Dawn Devonport with him, as we continue John Banville's haunting new novel.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

Alex Cleave finds solace as he returns to the Italian coast where his daughter died.

0720120724

In today's episode, Alex Cleave returns to Italy, to the coast where his beloved Cass died so mysteriously, and takes Dawn Devonport with him, as we continue John Banville's haunting new novel.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

Alex Cleave finds solace as he returns to the Italian coast where his daughter died.

0820120725

When Mrs Gray departs on holiday, Alex takes a trip to the seaside in search of his love.

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, Mrs Gray departs for Rossmore and a fortnight by the sea. Left behind, young Alex is bereft, and decides on a daring plan.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

0820120725

When Mrs Gray departs on holiday, Alex takes a trip to the seaside in search of his love.

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, Mrs Gray departs for Rossmore and a fortnight by the sea. Left behind, young Alex is bereft, and decides on a daring plan.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

0920120726

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, the end of summer heralds more than the turning of the seasons - and decades later, Alex Cleave knows that he must leave Italy for the answers are not there.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

A storm brings an end to a perfect summer, and something more.

0920120726

In today's episode of Ancient Light by John Banville, the end of summer heralds more than the turning of the seasons - and decades later, Alex Cleave knows that he must leave Italy for the answers are not there.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

A storm brings an end to a perfect summer, and something more.

10 LAST20120727

Today Dermot Crowley reads the concluding episode of John Banville's new novel, and Alex Cleave discovers that he was wrong about many things, though not about the power of love.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

Alex Cleave discovers that he was wrong about many things, but not about the power of love

10 LAST20120727

Today Dermot Crowley reads the concluding episode of John Banville's new novel, and Alex Cleave discovers that he was wrong about many things, though not about the power of love.

Man Booker winner John Banville's new novel, Ancient Light, is a story of an unlikely first love affair interwoven with darker memories of a lost daughter.

Alexander Cleave is an actor of a certain age, surprised to be plucked from relative obscurity for his first film role, to play a man of some mystery, Axel Vander. As he prepares for the role, he recollects the passion of his first love affair, when he was fifteen and 'Billy Gray was my best friend and I fell in love with his mother.' Alongside these memories circle more painful ones, of his beloved only daughter, who died in strange circumstances a decade ago.

Written with Banville's masterful command of language and dazzling prose, Ancient Light captures the intensity of first love and the intimate details of an illicit affair in rural Ireland in the fifties. Snatched assignations in a battered station wagon and the ruined Cotter's house are vividly evoked with perfect precision, as are the joy and absurdity, the selfishness and obsession of young love. Funny, seductive and moving, Banville skilfully weaves the past and the present together as he reveals the nature and unreliability of memory.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of fourteen previous novels, including The Sea, which won the 2005 Man Booker Prize. He was recently awarded the Franz Kafka Prize.

The reader is Dermot Crowley.

The abridger is Sally Marmion.

The producer is Di Speirs.

Alex Cleave discovers that he was wrong about many things, but not about the power of love