Agree To Differ

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Episodes

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01Fracking2014082020140823

Most discussion formats set out to define opposing points of view and offer the listener a choice between them - maximum disagreement, minimum consensus. Agree to Differ is Radio 4's new discussion programme where the aim is to give listeners a completely new way to understand a controversial issue and to decide where they stand. Often when it comes to debates in these contested areas the protagonists spend more time attacking and caricaturing each other than they do addressing the heart of the issue. Agree to Differ will use techniques from mediation and conflict resolution to discover what really divides them - and just as important - if there's anything they can agree on. The mediator is Matthew Taylor the chief executive of the RSA and subjects for this first series will be fracking, vivisection and the future of Jerusalem.

02Vivisection2014082720140830

Agree to Differ is Radio 4's new discussion programme where the aim is to give listeners a completely new way to understand a controversial issue and to decide where they stand. Presented by Matthew Taylor.

03 LASTJerusalem2014090320140906

Matthew Taylor presents a new discussion programme.

Agree to Differ is Radio 4's new discussion programme where the aim is to give listeners a completely new way to understand a controversial issue and to decide where they stand. Presented by Matthew Taylor.

0201Trident2016040620160409 (R4)

Two experts who passionately disagree on Trident renewal are challenged to reach agreement

A final decision to commit to the successor programme to Britain's nuclear weapons programme, Trident, is expected this year. For supporters, Trident is the ultimate security guarantee in the unpredictable strategic environment of the next forty-to-fifty years. For those against, Trident is militarily nonsensical, financially insane, and morally intolerable. You might feel you have heard a great deal on this subject and yet public opinion is still divided over the issue. In this programme the aim is to give listeners a completely new way to understand the debate and to decide where they stand. Two experts who passionately disagree on Trident renewal are challenged to reach agreement over their differences and bring clarity over what the disagreement is fundamentally about. Sir Malcolm Rifkind is a former Defence and Foreign Secretary and was once third in line to 'push the button'. Dr Rebecca Johnson is a life-long peace activist and Chief Executive of the Acronym Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy. They join Matthew Taylor for the first in a new series of Agree to Differ.

0202Anglican Communion And Homosexuality2016041320160416 (R4)

The Anglican Communion, the global body of the Anglican Church, is deeply divided over how it reconciles its differences on same-sex marriage. Many feel the Communion is being ripped apart by, on the one hand, Western provinces where gay Christians are welcomed into the Church and where there is growing support for same-sex marriage and, on the other, conservative provinces in Africa where homosexuality is seen as a 'sin' and in places is criminalised. It is a debate not just about different scriptural interpretations, but a power struggle between two opposing cultural world views. For some it is simply a question of what should come first; unity or justice? Jayne Ozanne is a gay British evangelical Christian. Reverend Canon Hassan John is from the Anglican church in Nigeria. They both join Matthew Taylor to see whether despite strongly opposing views they can agree to differ.

A discussion of same-sex marriage in the Anglican church.

0203Artificial Intelligence2016042020160423 (R4)

We are witnessing a momentous speed up in Artificial Intelligence - in the power of machines to learn, communicate and interact with us. On any day, AI provides hundreds of millions of people with search results, traffic predictions, translations in real time and it speeds up the operation of our laptops by guessing what we'll do next. Several companies are working on cars that can drive themselves? and AI techniques are playing a major role in science and medicine.

While the potential benefits of AI are thought to be huge, there have been increasing warnings from prominent figures in science and technology about the potential dangers. Just how 'intelligent' might the machines become? Will they be able to 'think' for themselves? Could they ever be 'conscious' - or is that just the stuff of science-fiction? And would we want them to be? Matthew Taylor is joined by Murray Shanahan, Professor of Cognitive Robotics at Imperial College and Mark Bishop, Professor of Cognitive Computing, Goldsmiths, University of London.

Discussion programme that gives listeners a new way to understand a controversial issue.