Africa's Fourth Estate

In the past decade, a media revolution in Africa and rapid liberalisation of the press have dramatically changed the way Africans view the world, their thinking, behaviour and expectations.

Tanzanian journalist Adam Lusekelo meets some of the movers and shakers in the continent's communications revolution and asks how they are changing in a post 9/11 world.

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In the past decade, a media revolution in Africa and rapid liberalisation of the press have dramatically changed the way Africans view the world, their thinking, behaviour and expectations.

Tanzanian journalist Adam Lusekelo meets some of the movers and shakers in the continent's communications revolution and asks how they are changing in a post 9/11 world.Businessman Reginald Mengi now privately owns or controls almost 70% of the media in Tanzania, which was all government controlled a decade ago.

What are the implications of this dramatic shift in media control, and is this healthy for Tanzania's emerging democracy?

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Caroline Mutoka, queen of the breakfast airwaves in Kenya, whose outspoken views about corruption has landed her station in court.

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Adam visits Rwanda to meet the production team of Urunana, a radio soap modelled on The Archers.

There's even an Eddie Grundy character.

Felicity Finch, the actress who plays Ruth, has been to train the actors in Rwanda.

In a country where 11% of the people are HIV-positive, the programme tackles taboo sexual health issues, and works to build peace and reconciliation after the genocide of 1994.

Then radio was used to devastating effect to whip up hatred and turn neighbour against neighbour, but now Urunana's enormous popularity has restored Rwandans' respect for radio.

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Adam meets Soli Philander, a well known Cape comedian, whose new reality TV show is attempting to tackle post-apartheid problems and change attitudes about what South Africans can do to help themselves.

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Amadou Mahtar Ba, one of the driving forces behind the internet revolution that has enabled parts of the continent to leapfrog into the 21st Century and will, he argues, play a vital role in Africa's future economic and political development.

Five years ago, concerned about negative western reporting of his continent, Ba founded Allafrica Global Media Group, of which he is president, and established the popular African news website, Allafrica.com, a site that has become an essential reference point for anyone seeking information on Africa or an African perspective on the world.