The A-z Of Easy Listening

George Martin presents 13 programmes about music for easy listening.

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Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
01A19980104

In the first programme, A is for a cappella, Cliff Adams, and the `Ameriachi' sound of Herb Alpert.

Brian Eno talks about ambient music, and George Martin compares notes on the art of arranging with two music makers - Billy May and Jimmie Haskell

02B19980111

is for background music, Bassey and baritones.

George Martin explores the link between bread and Boy George, and hears from lyricist Hal David, who talks about his partnership with Burt Bacharach.

03C19980118

is for clarinet, the Carpenters and consonance.

04D19980125

is for duets and some of the most unforgettable vocal combinations on record.

Plus a look at the Eurovision connection and the Hawaiian melodies of Exotica.

05F19980201

is for orchestrators Percy Faith and Robert Farnon, and Eric Satie's experiments with Furniture music.

06H19980208

is for harmony, humour and the influence of Hollywood.

07I & J19980215

I is for instruments and J is for the jazz connection.

08K & L19980222

K is for Kaempfert, and L is for Legrand, Lai and L'amour.

09M & N19980301

M is for Motown and muzak, and N is for the Nashville connection.

10O & P19980308

O is for Orbison and P is for pop and protest.

11R & S19980315

R is for rhythm and S is for Swingle Singers and space-age pop.

12S & T19980322

S is for strings, sweetening and Sinatra, and T is for television themes.

13V & W & Y & Z19980329

V is for voices, W for Jimmy Webb and Brian Wilson, and Y and Z are for `Yesterday' and the zither.

14 LASTEverything19980405

George Martin presents the last of 14 programmes delving into all aspects of music for easy listening, pulling together some of the elements that have emerged in the series.