6000 Postcards

Stacked in shoeboxes in a dusty cupboard, Richard Rawles of the Psychology Department of University College London stumbled upon 6000 dusty postcards, all dating from 1953.

On the back seemed to be answers to a questionnaire about left and right-handedness, but the cards had lain there ignored for 50 years.

An early example of viewer participation and a revealing survey in its own right, Chris McManus describes how he and his colleagues tracked the postcards to an early BBC TV science programme presented by Jacob Bronowski, and 50 years later put them through a computer-driven analysis to find out what they could tell us now about the people and the time they lived in.

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2006010620070103

Stacked in shoeboxes in a dusty cupboard, Richard Rawles of the Psychology Department of University College London stumbled upon 6000 dusty postcards, all dating from 1953.

On the back seemed to be answers to a questionnaire about left and right-handedness, but the cards had lain there ignored for 50 years.

An early example of viewer participation and a revealing survey in its own right, Chris McManus describes how he and his colleagues tracked the postcards to an early BBC TV science programme presented by Jacob Bronowski, and 50 years later put them through a computer-driven analysis to find out what they could tell us now about the people and the time they lived in.

2006010620070103

Stacked in shoeboxes in a dusty cupboard, Richard Rawles of the Psychology Department of University College London stumbled upon 6000 dusty postcards, all dating from 1953.

On the back seemed to be answers to a questionnaire about left and right-handedness, but the cards had lain there ignored for 50 years.

An early example of viewer participation and a revealing survey in its own right, Chris McManus describes how he and his colleagues tracked the postcards to an early BBC TV science programme presented by Jacob Bronowski, and 50 years later put them through a computer-driven analysis to find out what they could tell us now about the people and the time they lived in.

Stacked in shoeboxes in a dusty cupboard, Richard Rawles of the Psychology Department of University College London stumbled upon 6000 dusty postcards, all dating from 1953. On the back seemed to be answers to a questionnaire about left and right-handedness, but the cards had lain there ignored for 50 years.

An early example of viewer participation and a revealing survey in its own right, Chris McManus describes how he and his colleagues tracked the postcards to an early BBC TV science programme presented by Jacob Bronowski, and 50 years later put them through a computer-driven analysis to find out what they could tell us now about the people and the time they lived in.

20070103

Stacked in shoeboxes, Richard Rawles of the Psychology Department of University College London stumbled upon 6000 dusty postcards, dating from 1953 and ignored for 50 years.

Chris McManus describes how he and his colleagues tracked the postcards to an early BBC science programme presented by Jacob Bronowski and put them through a computer-driven analysis to find out what they could tell us now about the people and the time they lived in.