2, 3, 4 The Art Of Arranging

In this new six-part series, John Dankworth sets out to demistify the art of writing for jazz ensembles large and small.

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JF0120050205

In his first programme, John considers the overall skill of the arranger, using his own band to show how the same tune can be made to sound entirely different using a variety of arranger's "tricks".

He considers the arranging of Dizzy Gillespie, Bob Haggart and Eddie Sauter among others.

Playing in the studio with him are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone), Jimmy Hastings and Andy Panayi, reeds, John Horler, piano, Alec Dankworth, bass and Allan Ganley drums.

JF0220050212

John Dankworth continues his exploration of writing for jazz ensembles with a look at the reed section.

In the studio, the Dankworth Seven play excerpts from Duke Ellington's music to show how an arranger builds up the sound of the saxophones, and also explore how Glenn Miller achieved his distinctive style.

John considers the arranging of Don Redman, Benny Carter, Billy May, and Jimmy Giuffre.

In the Seven are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone), Jimmy Hastings (clarinet and tenor saxophone), Andy Panayi (alto and baritone saxophones), John Horler (piano), Alec Dankworth (bass) and Allan Ganley (drums).

JF0320050219

Today, John Dankworth looks at the role of the brass section, With the Dankworth Seven, he shows how skillful use of mutes can completely change the atmosphere of a piece, and later the band builds up its own head arrangement of Count Basie's Jumpin' At The Woodside.

Joining him in the studio are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone),

Jimmy Hastings (clarinet and tenor saxophone), Andy Panayi (alto and baritone saxophone), John Horler (piano), Alec Dankworth (bass) and Allan Ganley (drums).

JF0420050226

John Dankworth explores how arrangers have written for small groups, from the Miles Davis nonet to the bands of Gerry Mulligan and John Lewis.

In the studio he demonstrates how the Benny Goodman Quartet and the John Kirby Sextet achieved their unique sounds.

With him in the Dankowrth Seven are Guy Barker (trumpet); Mark Nightingale (trombone); Jimmy Hastings (clarinet and tenor saxophone); Andy Panayi (alto and baritone saxophones); John Horler (piano); Alec Dankworth (bass); and Allan Ganley (drums); plus their special guest Anthony Kerr (vibraphone).

JF0520050305

John Dankworth looks at how arrangers from Nelson Riddle to Quincy Jones have written for singers and instrumental soloists, including examples of his own work with Dame Cleo Laine, Gerry Mulligan and Dizzy Gillespie.

In the studio, the Dankworth Seven are joined by Jacqui Dankworth.

In the band are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone), Jimmy Hastings (clarinet/tenor saxophone), Andy Panayi (alto and baritone saxophones), John Horler (piano), Alec Dankworth (bass) and Allan Ganley (drums), with special guest Anthony Kerr.

JF06 LAST20050312

In the final programme of his six-part series on the arranger's role in jazz, John Dankworth looks at how jazz writing has spread into the world of films and television, and presents his five golden rules for any would-be arranger.

With the Dankworth Seven, he shows how his own theme from the film Saturday Night and Sunday Morning could be rewritten to show a range of emotions.

With him in the studio are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone), Jimmy Hastings (clarinet/tenor saxophone), Andy Panayi (alto/baritone saxophones), John Horler (piano), Alec Dankworth (bass), and Allan Ganley (drums).