1968 - The Sixty-eighters At Sixty

David Aaronovitch assesses the legacy of 1968, talking to the self-styled revolutionaries of 40 years ago.

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He talks to Foreign Office Minister Kim Howells, then a leader of the Hornsey Art College occupation.

Feminist Sheila Rowbotham recalls the communal house she was living in.

John Birt explains why his rigorous reforms as BBC Director General follow on from his youthful anti-establishment views.

Right-wing columnist Bruce Anderson talks about his youthful communist self and why he changed, partly as a result of the conflict in his native Northern Ireland.

Finally, David visits Northern Ireland itself to explore the outcome of the civil rights movement and the aggression it provoked, now seen by many as a crucial step in Ulster's descent into violence.

Contributors include Kim Howells, Sheila Rowbotham and Bruce Anderson.

He talks to Foreign Office minister Kim Howells, then a leader of the Hornsey Art College occupation.

John Birt explains why his rigorous reforms as BBC director general followed on from his youthful anti-establishment views.

02 LAST2008081120081229

In Berlin, David looks at how the age of rebellion shaped today's Germany.

David Aaronovitch assesses the legacy of 1968, talking to the self-styled revolutionaries of 40 years ago.

Visiting Berlin, he talks to former rebel Thomas Schmid, now a senior editor with Springer newspapers.

Educationalist Katharina Rutschky explains how a movement which produced the brutality of the notorious Baader-Meinhof gang also paved the way for a revolution in childcare.

Other contributors include novelist Peter Schneider and Green MP Marie-Luise Beck.